CATALOGUE 1941.

Australian Native Plants

A Plant for Every Purpose

NINDETHANA NURSERY

. ' - . . .

!r■ -V . '• ■■ • . ■ • ■ - •.    .. *    '

Dripstone, N.S.W., Australia.

G. W. ALTHOFER, Proprietor.

PHONF 7 DRIPSTONF.

“Times’’ Print, Wellington.


General Directions

Most plants listed do well under hot, dry conditions and stand frost after first year. It is a good rule always to shelter plants during the first winter from wind, frost and sun. Early planting is recommended west of the mountains, and in all low rainfall areas. Though March, April, May and September are the best months to plant, if reasonable care is taken, the period, March to October inclusive, is safe.

Do not use farmyard manure near native plants.

Do not disturb soil around young plant when setting out. Set out plants a fraction lower than nursery level, i.e., just cover ball of earth with soil, watering well at the same time.

Native plants have a longer flowering period and are hardier than most exotics. Most of them benefit by judicious pruning. Nearly all resent digging close up to the stems. In dry inland areas, to overcome this difficulty, make a raised earthen ring with a diameter of about 4 feet around each plant. Fill this ring to a depth of 3 inches with partly decomposed leaves and grass. Hand weed when necessary. To water, partly fill raised earthen ring every 10 days in dry weather.

At times it is necessary to substitute when varieties are sold out. If customers would kindly advise when ordering whether or not they wish me to adhere to this rule, much time and trouble would be saved.

Order by Number

For the convenience of customers who sometimes find difficulty in negotiating the long technical names of many of our plants, I have adopted this system.

It is only necessary to quote the marginal No. of the plant required, together with the year the catalogue was issued.

All plants priced at 1/6 available at 15/- dozen.

All plants priced at 1/9 available at 16/6 dozen.

All plants priced at 2/- available at 20/- dozen.

.

Half dozen lots at dozen rates.

This price list cancels all previous ones.

ACACIA (Wattle)

ri he Acacia (Wattle) family is one of the most extensive ir* Australia, and, tor general excellence and hardiness, diversity of dower and foliage, the family is unexcelled. Over 400 species are native to this country, and, of this number, one only (Farnesi-ana) is found beyond our shores. This list contains a Wattle for every purpose, and they range from the tiniest dwarf to noble trees.

No.

1— ACCOLA: One of the loveliest of all. In late winter and early

spring it is loaded down with masses of golden bloom. A narrow-leaved species, it forms a shapely tree up to 20 feet ..... .......................................... ................ .................    1/9

2— ACUMINATA: The Raspberry Jam Tree of Western Aus

tralia. A fine species with golden, rod-like flowers and narrow leaves. Does exceptionally well in dry areas. 30 feet ..................................................... ........................ 1/6

3— ANEURA: Mulga. A fine tree in inland dry areas. 20 ft. 1/6

4— ARMATA: Large, deep golden flowers. Prickly. Makes

good hedge. 7 feet....................................................... 1/6

5— AURICULIFORMIS: A new species from North Australia.

Worth a trial in tropical and semi-tropical areas. 10 feet .............................................................................. 2/-

6— BA1LEYANA: The well-known Cootamundra Wattle. Found

in its wild state over a very restricted area around Temora and Cootamundra, N.S.W. If about one third of growth is cut away immediately after flowering, the life of the tree is prolonged and the appearance is enhanced. One of the best. 20 to 25 feet .................. 1/6

7— BROWNII: This species I consider to be one of the finest of

the dwarf wattles and is worthy of a place in any garden. Large flowers. 3 feet................................................. 2/-

8— BUXIFOLIA: Hardy dwarf. Does well in exposed position.

8 feet............................................................................... 1/6

9— CALAMIFQLIA: Lovely narrow-leaved species from the dry

centre of the continent and recommended for low

1/9

from

......2/6

dense

1/6


rainfall areas. 8 to 10 feet.........................................

10— COCH'LEOCARPA:    New golden-flowered species

Western Australia. 8 feet ....................................

11— CONFERTA: Golden Top. Fine dwarf kind, bearing

heads of intense golden flowers. 8 feet ................

blue-grey

....... 1/6


12—CULTRIFORMIS: Knife-leaved Wattle. Unique foliage and fine flower-heads. 8 feet ...............

13—CYANOPHYLLA: Blue-leaved Wattle of Western Australia.

Very large, bright yellowT blossoms on long, pendulous branches. Late flowerer. 15 feet .............................. 1/6

1

14— DEALBATA: Silver Wattle. One of the finest for all dis

tricts. 30 feet. ............- .............—.....— — — — 1/6

15— DEANII:    An attractive and hardy fern-leaved type which

deserves to be more widely planted. 15 feet .......—.    1/9

1€—DECORA: Hardy dwarf kind from N.S.W. Stands hot, dry climate well. 5 feet    .— — — .............—    -......... —    1/6

17— DECURRENS NORMALIS: Queen Wattle. Strong grower.

suited for deep-soil locations. Fine foliage. 30 ft. 1/6

18— DISCOLOR: Sunshine Wattle. Handsome shrubby kind.

Light yellow bloom.    10 to 15 feet ..........................—    1/6

19— DRUMMONDII: Considered by many to be the finest of the

dwarf wattles. Fern-like foliage and abundance of bloom. 4 to 5 feet .......— — .............— •— — —    2/-

20— ELATA: Cedar WTattle. The tallest growing wattle. Likes

a deep soil location. Makes a handsome tree. 40 to 50 feet ............ .......... — — — ...... -...........— — — ~    1/6

21— ELONGATA: One of the ribbon-leaved    wattles.    A    very

fine tall shrub. 10 to 15 feet .................. -..............    1/6

22— FARNESIANA: Sponge Wattle. The flowers of this wattle

are used as a base for a delightful perfume in Tunisia. 12 to 15 feet................- .— ......... —    1/6

23— FLORLBUNDA: A fine species with long, narrow leaves,

forming a dense compact small tree. 15 feet ...... .—    1/6

24— GLADIIFORMIS:    A hardy and extremely floriferous shrub.

Recommended. 8 feet........................................- .......—    1/6

25— GLAUCESCENS: One of the finest of all where summer

watering is available. Among the best for coastal areas. 25 feet ............................................................ 1/6

26— GNIDIUM: A Queensland species for dry areas. 15 feet. 1/6

-HETEROCLITA:    Quannot of West Australia.


27


A narrowleaved dwarf. Quite hardy. 4 feet .— —........—    1/9

28—HOWITTIT: A Victorian species with rod-like flowers.

8 feet ................................................................. ...... •••"*    1/9

2^—ITEAPHYLLA: A good tall hedge wattle. Plant 4 to 5 feet

apart. 12/- dozen ..............-.................- — — —    1/3

:>0—JONESIT: One of the loveliest of the dwarf wattles. Rather

7

slow grower. Feather-leaved. 6 to 8 feet .......—    1/9

til—JUNIPERINA:    Prickly-leaved. Pale yellow flowers.

8 feet ............................- -..............................— — — —    1/6

32— KETTLEWELLII: Hardy and decorative dwarf from the

southern mountain regions. 6 feet .......-...................-    1/9

33— LEPROSA:1    Narrow-leaved weeping species. Pale flowers

but very attractive. 15 feet .................. — — —    1/6

34— ILIGULATA: Useful in dry, sandy areas. 10 feet ............ 1/6

35— LINIFOLTA: Flax-leaved Wattle. Good dwarf kind. Requires

hard cutting after flowering to keep shapely. 8 to

1/6


12 feet ............

36—LOXGliFOLIA: One of the best where climate suits it.

Requires watering if summer is exceptionally dry.

Rod-like flowers. 15 feet. ..... ..... .................. .........-    1/6

ST—MELANOXYLON: Blackwood. Australia’s most    valuable

timber. Strong grower, especially in cooler areas. Good shade and street tree. 30 to 40 feet .......................    1/6

38— MOLLISSIMA: Black Wattle. Fast growing kind. Lovely

foliage. 30 to 40 feet .................. .........~............. ......    1/6

39— MYRTIFOLIA: One of the best dwarf hedge wattles. Plant

4    feet apart. 4 to 6 feet ...... ............................. ..... 1/3

40— OBTUSATA: Rather slow growing N.S.W. species. 6 to 8

feet ...................................................... ......-.....~.............. 1/6

41— OSWALD1I: Umbrella Bush. Good in dry areas. 8 ft. 1/9

42— OXYCEDRUS: A fine decorative wattle in the spike-leaved

class. Large flowers. 5 to 8 feet ..... .................. 1/9

43— PENNINERVIS: Hickory Wattle. An upright growing species

for dry areas. 25 feet ................................................ 1/6

4 4—PODALYR1AEFOLIA: Queensland Wattle. One of the finest and hardiest. (Silvery leaves and abundant flowers. 15 feet....................................................................... .................. 1/6

45— POLYBOTRYA: Western Silver Wattle. Lovely pinnate-leav

ed, hardy tall shrub. Weeping habit. 15 feet ...... 1/9

46— PROM1NENS: Golden Rain Wattle. Very attractive species.

15 feet ....................................................................-........ 1/6

47— PRUINOSA: Frosty Wattle. Beautiful spreading kind. A

quick grower and is a gem where summer watering is

available. Summer flowering. 20 feet'*..................    1/3

4 8—PUBESCENS: Downy Wattle. Rarest and most beautiful wattle. Soft,, feathery foliage and pendulous branches. Is hardy but will do better where regular summer watering is available. 10 to 15 feet .................................... 1/9

49— PULCIIELLA: A dwarf, pinnate-leaved species from Western

Australia. Has small, golden spines, pendulous branches and large flower-balls. 5 to 8 feet .............................. 1/6

50— PYCNANTHA: Golden Wattle. Upright, hardy, small tree.

Large leases and flower balls. Will grow in most exposed positions.    20    feet........................................... 1/6

51 RUB IDA: Red-leaved Wattle. Foliage turns red in winter.

Hardy anywhere and    very attractive. Cut hard after

flowering. 8 feet ............................................................ 1/6

52 _RUPICOLA: Rock Wattle. Hardy dwarf. Large flowers.

5    feet .............................................................................. 1/9

53 _SALUCINA: Cooba or Willow Wattle. Inland species. 15

to 20 feet......................................................................... 1/6

54 _SALIGNA: Western Australian Weeping Wattle. A very fine

species with exceptionally long leaves. 12 to 15 ft. 1/6

55 _JSOPHORAE: Coast Wattle. Useful in exposed coastal areas.

8 to 10 feet ........................................................................ 1/6

56— SPECTABILIS: Mudgee Wattle. Attractive silver, pinnate

leaved shrub. Cut hard after flowering. 8 to 12 ft. 1/6

57— STRICTA: Upright Wattle. Very hardy. 5 to 8 feet. 1/6

58— SUAVEOLEXS: Sweet-scented Wattle. Pale yellow blooms.

6 feet--------------— ----------------— — — _____    1/6

59— VERTICILLATA: Unique dark-green foliage. Large flower«.

Recommended for the cooler areas. 12 to 15 feet......    1/6

60— VESTITA: Weeping Boree. Lovely weeping species for

rockiest and most exposed positions. One of the best. 12 to 15 feet---------------------------— — —    1/9

61— VICTORIAE: Rou^d-secued Wattle. A very fine species from

the desert areas. 8 to 10 feet .................................... 2/-

GENERAL LIST

62— AGONIS FLEXUOSA: Western Australian flowering Willow.

Very hardy and does well in limestone areas. Is best cut hard after    flowering. White. 15 to 25    feet ...... 1/6

63— ALBIZZIA LOPAXTHA: Beautiful foliage plant closely allied

to the Acacias. Large greenish flowers of Bottle-brush type. Makes a good quick-growing hedge, but is not a long liver. 8    feet ...............-..........••............................ 1/6

64— ANGOPHORA INTERMEDIA: The inland Apple Myrtle. A

very hardy and showy tree. Fast grower.    50 feet.

White........................................................................... 1/6

65— ANGOPHORA LANCEOLATA: Apple Myrtle. Quick

growing tree for deep-soil locations. White. 50 feet. 1/6

66— ANIGOZANTHOS    MANGLESII:    Kangaroo    Paw.    Very

peculiar flower heads. Likes moist situation. 3 feet. Red, green, and yellow'....................................................... 2/-

67— ANIGOZANTHOS FLAVIDA:    Yellow Kangaroo Paw.

3 feet .................................................... 1/9

6S—ANIGOZANTHOS PURPUREA: New species. Very hardy.

Green, yellow' and red. 3 feet .................................... 2/-

69— ARAUCARIA BIDWILLII: Bunya Pine. Fine tree for deep

soil locations. 50 to 60 feet .......................................... 2/-

70— BANKSIA ERECIFOLIA: Attractive shrub for coast or

mountains. 8 to 12 feet ................................................ 1/9

71— BEYERIA VISCOSA: Wallaby Bush. Should make a good

dwarf hedge or clipped specimen. 6 feet .................. 1/6

72_BORONIA MEGASTLGMA: Brown Boronia. Likes a shelter

ed, well drained position. Keep moist in summer

time. 3 feet........................................................................ 2/-

73—BRACKYCHITON    ACERIFOLIA:    Illawarra    Flame    Tree.

Does well in coastal areas and slopes. Will grow inland if given a deep soil location and sheltered in the early stages from frosts. Drops leaves in November and then

is covered with red, bell-shaped flowers. 30 feet ...... 2/-

4

7 4—B R A C H Y C HIT ON DIVERSIFOUA: Kurrajong. The best street and avenue tree for dry areas. Valuable fodder

tree. 40 feet ______________________________________ _______________ 1/6

75—BRACHYSEMA LA N CEO LATE M: Swan River Scarlet Pea.

Attractive, hardy dwarf with brilliant scarlet flowers in late winter and early spring. 4 feet ........................ 2/-

CALL1STEMON (Bottle Brushes)

Callistemon is derived from the Greek kallistos, beautiful, and stemon,    a stamen,    referring to    the    beautiful    colouring    of the

stamens    of many of    the    species.    The    Bottle    Brushes are amongst

the most showy and decorative of our shrubs and trees. If cut well back after flowering they remain shapely. A nedge of lanceo-latus or phoniceus is a line sight during the flowering period.

76— C. ACUMINATES: A very showy dwarf species, with red

flowers. 1 feet..................................... .............................. 1/9

77— C. LANCEOLATUS: Brilliant red-flowered species. Makes

good hedge. Hardy anywhere. 10 feet ............ 1/6

78— C.    LINEARIS: Narrow-leaved species.    Red flowers.

5    to 8 feet.............................................................................. 1/9

79— C. PALLIDUS:    The    river Bottle    Brush    of    Tasmania.    Erect

growth. Cream    flowers.    15    feet .............................. 2/-

80— C. PALUDOSUS: Does best in moist situations. This form

of paludosus is deep scarlet. 6 feet......................... 21-

£1—C. PHONICIUS: Fiery red species from West Australia. Does well in a moist situation and relishes a clay soil. 8 ft. 21-

82— C. PINIFOLIUS: A very fine species with yellowish flowers.

6    feet.................................................................................... 1/9

83— C. PINIFOLIUS var. VIRIDIFLORUSs This variety is highly

recommended for the unique green flower spikes. 6 ft. 21-

84— C. TERETIFOLIUS: New species from Central Australia.

Should do well in dry areas. Red flowers. Rare. 7 ft. 2/6

85— C. VIMINALIS: Queensland weeping Bottle Brush. Brilliant

scarlet    flowers. Grows 8 to 60 feet according

to situation ........................................................................ 2/-

86— C. VIOLACEA: Tall dense-growing shrub with violet flower

spikes.    12 feet .................................................................. 2/-

CALLITRiS

The Australian Cypress Pine group. Very hardy avenue, plantation and specimen trees. Suitable for all but the extreme tropics. Without exception our conifers in this group respond well to cultivation.

87—C. CALCARATA: Black Pine. Handsome tree. Best in dry

areas. 40 to 50 feet....................................................... 1/6

COLUMELLARIS: A tree of outstanding loveliness. I am able to offer a limited number of this fine conifer and can guarantee them true to type. 50 to 60 feet —    2/6

88—    C.

89— C.

90— C.


91—C.


92—C.


CUPRESSJFORMIS: Port Jackson Cypress. For coastal

areas. 40 feet — -......... — — ..............— —    2 -

MUELLERII: A coastal N.S.W. and Queensland species.

2/-


25 feet

NANA:    A lovely smoke-blue foliaged dwarf from West

Australia. 5 to 7 feet .............................................—    2/6

ROBUSTA:    Makes a good specimen or avenue tree,

especially in dry areas. Valuable timber tree. 40 to 50 feet ................................... ..........................— —    1/6

CALOTHAMNUS (Net Bush)

Hardy and decorative Western Australian plants. The Net Bushes are suited for the very poorest of soils, but will thrive in any position. Always cut hard back after flowering. Good as a dwarf hedge or as a specimen.

93—C.


94— C.

95— C.

96— C.

97— C.

98— C.


ASPER: The best of the light foliage species. Highly recommended. Curious drooping red flowers. 5

to 6 feet ..................................................................    2/-

GILLIESI1: New Brilliant red-flowering species. 6 ft. 2/-

LATERALIS var. LONGIFOLIA: Unlike any of the other

species listed here. A unique plant. 5 ft. Red ...... 2/6

QUADRIFIDUS: One of the best. Dark-green, pine-like

foliage. Red. 6 feet ................................................ 1/6

SANGUINEUS: Blood red flowers. 6 to 8 feet ...... 2/-

SERPENTINUS:    Drooping branches with red flowers.

5 to 7 feet .................................................................. 2/-

CASSIA

The Australian Cassias are not given the space they deserve in public and private gardens. All are hardy decorative shrubs with golden yellow flowers.

99— C. ARTEMISIOIDES:    A fine dwarf with silvery foliage.

Likes a well drained    situation. 4    to 7 feet ............ 2/-

100— C.    AUSTRALIS: Larger    flowers than    the preceding    species

and likes a moister    situation.    Deep green    leaves.

5 feet ........................................................................ 2/-

101—C. EREMOPHYLLA: Native Daphne. The finest of all the dwarf Cassias. Compact and floriferous shrub. Give well-drained position and do not disturb soil at rooi?. Cut well back after flowering Very scarce this season. 2/€

102— CASSINIA ACULEATA: Hardy shrub for poor soil situation.

Cut hard after flowering. Small white flowers. 5 to 6 feet ......................... ...................._ _.................... 1/6

103— CASUARINA CUNNINGHAM LANA: The River Oak. A ny

deep soil location will grow this fine tree. 40 to 50 ft. 1/6

104— CASUARINA STRICTA: Mountain Oak. Will do well in

rocky situations. 20 to 25 feet .............................. 1/6

105— CERATOPETALUM GUMMIFERUM: The well-known N.S.W.

Xmas Bush. Does well on coast and mountains. 20 to 25 feet .......................................................................    2/-

106— CHAMAELAUCIUM UNCINATUM: Geraldton Wax Plant.

Lovely foliage and exquisite blooms combine to makt this an outstanding shrub. Impatient of bad drainage and over manuring. Cut hard after flowering. Pink flowers. 5 feet ............................................................ 2/-

107— CHEIRANTHERA LINEARIS: A tiny shrubby plant for a

dry corner. Has intense blue flowers up to an inch in diameter. 18 inches ................................................ 1/6

108— CHORIZEMA CORDATUM: Flame Pea of Western Aus

tralia. One of the best small shrubs. Hardy anywhere. Orange and red. 2 to 3 feet .............................. 1/9

109— CHORIZEMA 1LICIFOLEUM: Holly-leaved Flame Pea.

Orange and Red. 3 feet ................................................ 2/-

110— CROTALARIA CUNNINGHAMII: West Australian Bird

Flow’er. Curious yellow and green flowers. 5 ft.......    2/-

111— DIANELLA COERULEA: Blue Lily. Rockery plant, with

blue flowers followed by brilliant blue berries. 2 feet 1/6

112— DIPLOLAENA GRANDIFLORA: One of the finest novelties

of recent years. The Wild Rose of Western Australia is a shrub of 5 or 6 feet bearing large flowers in September of a deep    rosepink........................................... 3/6

113— DODONEA LANCEOLATA: Native Hop Bush. Attractive

shrub with brilliant coloured seed vessels. 10 ft.......    1/6

114— DORYANTHES EXCELSA: -Spear or Gymea Lily. Sword

like leaves and tall flower stems up to 15 feet, with red flow ers ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... jl

1 15—ELEOCARPUS CYANEUS: Blue-berry Myrtle. Fine small tree with glossy leaves and attractive blue berries.

20 to 25 feet ............................................................ 2/-

116—ERYTHRINA 1NDI-CA—Coral Tree. Hardy, except under driest conditions. Brilliant red flowers. Deciduous. 25 feet ........................................................................ 2/-

EUCALYPTUS


The familiar Gum Trees of our bushland, with species rangag from small shrubs to trees of gigantic size. There are many decorative shrubs and small trees in this section. Some of the West Australian species are amongst the world’s finest flowering trees and shrubs. This season I am able to offer a larger range of species, and plants will be found amongst these to suit every soil and climate.


118

119-

¡20

121


AXGULOSA: New species from Western Australia. Dwarf

with pale salmon flowers. 8 to 10 feet .................. 21-

BAXCROFTII; Orange Gum of Northern Tablelands, N.S.W.

Handsome species. 30 to 40 feet .............................. 1/6

BLAKELYII: A beautiful medium sized tree and very useful for planting in damp, waterlogged areas. Is exceptionally

fine in bud and flower. 30 to 40 feet ........................ 1/6

CAESiA: Lovely deep pink flowering, almost ever-blooming

species from Western Australia. 15 to 20 feet ...... 2 -

CALOPHYLLA ROSEA: The pink flowered Port Gregory Gum. Closely allied to ficifolia and, like this species, does not always come true from seed. Flowers may be of pink and red or pure white. 20 to


122

123

.24-


various shades

.................

-CITRIODORA:    The

growing tree. 40


A


y


1 26127128


1 29130-


............ 1/6

lovely fast

............ 1/6

Sugar Gum. breakwind

............    1/3


Lemon-scented Gum.

to 60 feet ..................

CLA.DOCALYX:    (Syn. Euc. corynocalyx)

Good fast-growing avenue, plantation

tree. 50 feet ..............................................

OORONATA:    New Western Australian species with large

cream flowers. 8 feet ................................................ 2/-

COSMOPHYLLA: Cup Gum of South Australia. A lovely yellow flowered tree. It is particularly pleasing when in bud; the large frosted buds make an effective table

decoration. 15 to 30 feet .......................................... 2/-

CRUCIS: ('Silver Mallee. Ideal border or shrubbery plant

for dry areas. 8 to 15 feet .................................... 2/-

EREMOPHILA:    Sand Mallee.    A Western Australian

species with large flowers, either yellow or pink. Will

grow in almost pure sand. 10 to 20 feet .................. 1/9

ERYTHROCORYS: A handsome small tree from Western Australia. Large brilliant red flower buds and deep yellow flo\vers. There is nothing finer in its class than

this tree. 15 to 20 feet ............

ERYTHRONEMA var. Lairdii: New from Western Australia. 8 to 15 EUGENIOIDES: White Stringybark.

forestry. 50 to 70 feet ..................

8


or


red flowering

feet ..................

Fine tree for


2/6

pecies

! 2 -coastal ... 1/6


131— EX1M1A: Yellow Bloodwood. Handsome ornamental for

coast, slopes and mountain areas. 30 to 40 feet.......    1/6

132— FIC1FOLIA: The famous Western Australian Red Flowering-

Gum. Does well in most parts of the Commonwealth except where frosts are excessive or where drainage is bad. Individual plants may have flowers of red, pink or cream. No    guarantee can be given    that    plants    wid

produce red    flowers. Shelter both    this    species    and

ealophylla rosea from frost during first few years of growth. 30 feet ..........................................................- ...... 1/0

133— FORREST1 ANA: Another new species from Western Aus

tralia. Golden flowers. 8 to 12 feet .................. 2 -

134— GLOBULUS COMPACTA: A dwarf form of the Tasmanian

Blue Gum. Recommended for mountain and slopes districts. 30 feet ............................................................ 1/9

135— G ROSS A: New yellow flowered Western Australian species.

Large flowers. 4 to 8 feet..................................... 2/-

13G—GUMMIFERA:    Bloodwood. A fine tree    for    coastal    and

mountain forestry. Ornamental also.    40 to 60 ft.    1/6

137— HEM1PHLOIA: White Box. A great tree for dry areas and

slopes districts. 50 feet .......................................... 1/6

138— INTERTEXT A: Coolabah. A good tree for dry inland

areas. 40 to 50 feet ...................................................... 1/6

139— JOYCEAE: An attractive coastal (N.S.W.) species for poor

sandstone formations. 20 to 30 feet ........................ 1/6

140— LEHMANNI: Fast growing small tree with large greenish

flowers in huge clusters. 20 to 30 feet .................. 1/9

141— LEUCOXYLON var macrocarpa: A South Australian Malice

with large crimson, pink or white flowers. Fine dwarf. 12 to 20 feet .................................................................. 2/-

142— MACROCARPA: Coolgardie Rose. The largest flowered of

all, with brilliant red flowers up to 5 inches across. Decorative seed vessels. Rather straggly shrub. Difficult to grow, but where drainage is good, or in the dry areas a reasonable chance of success is assured. 8 to 10 ft. 2/6

143— MACULATA: Spotted Gum. A fast growing timber tree for

slopes, mountains and coast. 50 to 60 feet ............ 1/6

144— MELLIODORA: Yellow Box. Attractive shade and honey

tree. 60 feet .................................................................. 1/6

145— MELLIODORA ROSEA: A red-flowered form of the well-

known Yellow Box. May not always come true to type as regards colour, but is a lovely tree. 40 to 50 ft. 1/9

TIG—NICKOL1I: Willow-leaved Peppermint. A lovely weeping species with very narrow leaves. 30 to 50 feet ...... 1/9

J47—NUMEROSA (Syn. Eue. Lindleyana): A slender, narrowleaved tree for mountain and slopes districts. 30 to

50 feet .............................................................................. 1/9

9

] 18—NUTANS: A very fine red-flowered dwarf. Flowers October-November. 6 to 8 feet — — —.....- —------— —    2/-

149— OLDFIELDJI: Yellow-flowered Mallee. 6 to 10 feet _    2/-

150— PLATYPUS: A West Australian tree of fine form and orna

mental appearance. 20 to 25 feet ...... .............— —    1/9

151— POPULIFOLIA: Bimble Box. A tree specially adapted for

shade and ornamental purposes in the drier areas of Australia. 30 feet — — — — — ..........- — —    1/6

152— PREISSIANA: One of the best of the West Australian dwarf

flowering gums. Large golden yellow flowers. 8 to 10 feet ............ .................. .— .......... — - — — — 2/-

153— RACEMOSA (Syn. Euc. Grebra) : Narrow-leaved Ironbark.

This is a lovely tree that does well over a wide area. 00 to 70 feet ................- ...... -.................................. —    1/6

154— ROSTRATA: River Red Gum. Strong grower for deep soil

locations inland. 60 feet .................................- —    1/6

155— RUBIDA: A    fine shade and ornamental    tree for areas of

•relatively    high altitude. 60 feet ...................— ...... 1/6

156— SEPULCRALIS: Weeping Gum. Large flowers and slender

drooping    branches. One of the finest    of the recent

novelties. 20 feet ............................................... —    2/-

157— ‘SLDEROXYLON ROSEA: Red-flowered Ironbark. Excellent

for slopes    and dry areas. Fast g-rowei    * 40    to 50 ft. 1/9

158— STRICKLAND!!: A useful ornamental small tree for the dry

areas. 20 to 30 feet ....................................................... 2/-

159— TORQUATA: Coral Gum. Lovely little tree with orange or

red flowers. Will flower at 2 or 3 years of age. 12 to 15 feet ........................................................................ —    2/-

160— EUGENIA SMITHII: Lilly Pilly. Suitable for coast and

mountain areas. 20 to 30 feet .............................. 2/-

161— GOODENIA OVATA: Yellow-flowered shrub or semi-trailer

for dry, rocky position. 3 feet ...................................-    1/6

162— GOODfA LOT1FOLIA: Clover Bush. Nice hardy shrub with

yellow and brown flowers. 4 feet .............................. 1/6

GREV1LLEA

The Grevillea family contains many desirable shrubs and tree? suitable for small and large gardens alike. They are for the most part thoroughly hardy and grow equally well in the dry inland areas and the humid coastal districts.

163—DALLACIIIANA: A wonderful small shrub for almost any position or climate. Flowers for 6 months of the year.

Red and white. 3 feet ...................................................... 2/-

10

164— PUNICEA: Crimson flowered small shrub. 3 to 4 ft.......    2/-

165— ROBUSTA: Silky Oak. One of the finest avenue trees.

Makes a gorgeous display in any climate. 30 feet. 1 6

166— RGSMARINIFOLIA: iHardy shrub with fine large flower

heads and long flowering period. Red and white. 5 ft. 2/-16?—SERICEA: Silky leaved Grevillea. Pink flowers. 3 ft. 1/9

168—\TESTITA: A hardy shrub with cream, spidery flowers which almost cover the plant in early spring. 5 feet ...... t/tf

HAKEA

Another hardy race of flowers bearing cream, white or red flowers. The Hakeas as a rule are very impatient of bad drainage, and this applies particularly to such species as laurina and multil-ineata.

169— iDAOTYLOIDES :    Attractive white flowered subject. 6

to 8 feet •♦••••    •••*•• HIM* MMt* •»••••    *»♦♦»»    ••••»»    ••••»• •HIM •*»*»•    ••••»•

170— LAURINA (Syn. Eucalyptioides) : Pincushion Tree of West

Australia. Crimson and cream flowers in winter and early spring. 10 to 15 feet .......................................... 2/-

171— MULTILINE AT A: The finest of all the Hakeas. but the

most difficult to grow in any but dry, well-drained positions. Bottle brush like flowers of deep red. 12ft.    2/6

172— PROPINQUA:- Pretty little shrub for poor soil location.

5 to 7 feet. White ...................................................... 1/9

173— SALIGNA: Willow-leaved Hakea. Fine tree with lovely

coloured new foliage. Cream. 10 to 15 feet ............ 1/6

HARDENBERGIAS

Hardy shrubs or climbers. Those listed will give a grand display in spring or early summer. May be treated as shrubs if leading shoots are pinched back from time to time. (See also climbers).

174— ALBA: A lovely white form of monophylla from South

Australia. 5 feet ...................................................... 1/6

175— COMPTONIANA: Species from West Australia, with intense

blue flowers. More inclined to climb than others of £he genus. 12 feet ............................................................ 1/9

176— MONOPHYLLA: False JSarsaparilla. Purple flowers. An

attractive plant at all    times..................................... 1/6

11

1 77—MONOPHYLLA OVATA:

1 78—MONOPHYLLA ROSEA: pretty ...... ........................


Shrubby kind.    5 feet -/Rose flowered form.    Very

....................L...... _ ...... ..... 2/-


179— HELICHRYSUM DIOSM1FOLIA: A hardy shrub with white

flowers of papery texture. 6 to 8 feet .................. 1/9

180— HIBISCUS HUEGELII: The sky-blue Hibiscus of West and

South Australia. Lovely flowers several inches in diameter. Scarce. 5 feet ................................................ 2/6

HOVEA

The Hoveas are all attractive small shrubs noted for the profusion and the intensity of colouring of their flowers.

181— LANCEOLATA: A fine purple-flowered shrub. Hardy in

any well-drained position. 3 feet ........................ 1/6

182— PUNGENS:    West Australian species with lovely blue

flowers. 2 feet ............................................................ 2/-

188—TRISPERM A: Larger flowers than either of the preceding-kinds. Deep purple. 2 feet .................................... 2/-

184— ID1GOFERA AUSTRALIS: A nice shrub with long spikes of

pink flowers. 4 feet ................................................ 1/9

185— LAMBERTiA FORMOSA: Honey Flower. Hardy shrub for

well drained areas on coast and mountains. Red or deep pink flowers. 5 feet ...................................................... 2 /-

186— LEPTOSPERMUM OVALIFOLEUM: Lovely large pink

flowers in winter. Nip back leading shoots to keep shapely. 3 to 4 feet ...................................................... 2/-

187— MACADAMIA TERN1FOLIA: Australian Nut. Handsome

ornamental tree producing nuts of commercial value. 30 feet .............................................................................. 2/-

MELALEUCA

The Melaleucas are noted for their abundance of flowers and for their general hardiness. Will stand hard cutting and are better for it.

188—CARDIOPHYLLA: A new dwarf red flowering species from

West Australia. 4 feet ...... .......................................... 2/-

12

189— ERICIFOLIA: Fast growing kind with white Bottle Brush

like flowers. 10 to 15 feet ........... ........................ .... 2/-

190— FULGENS: Deep pink flowers, like small Bottle Brushes.

One of the best. 5 to 6 feet .................. .................. 2/-

191— HUEGBLIi: Species with long flower spikes and very grace

ful foliage. 5 feet .............................. ..........- ............ 2/-

192— HYPERICIFOLIA: One of the best of the dwarf Melaleucas.

ISmal! red flowers of Bottle Brush type. Very showy as a hedge*. 0 to 10 feet..................................................... 1/6

193— LATERITIA: Robin Redbreast Bush of West Australia. A

very fine species with large flowers. Cut hard after flowering. Brilliant red. 6 to 8 feet ........................ 2/-

194— LEUCADENDRON: The lovely white-flowering Tea Myrtle of

Queensland and N.S.W. Likes a damp situation. '20 to 30 feet .................................................................. 2/-

195— NODOSA: An attractive fine-leaved dwarf. New ...... 2/-

196— PURPULIFLORA:    Small shrub with purple flowers and

coloured foliage in winter. 5 feet .............................. 2/-

197— STEEDMANII: New, -red-flowered dwarf from Western Aus

tralia. 3' feet .................................................................. 2/-

198— THYMIFOLIA: Very dwarf. Attractive foliage and red

flowers. 2 to 3 feet ...............-..................................... 2/-

199— WILSONII: Victorian and South Australian species, with

purple flowrers. 4 to 6 feet .................................... 21-

300—MELIA AZEDERACK: White Cedar. Hardy fast growing specimen or avenue tree for all climates. Deciduous. Lilac flowers. 30 feet ................................................ 1/6

201— PETROPHILA PULCHELLA: A N.S.W. plant with orna

mental foliage. White flowers. 5 feet........................ 1/9

202— PHOLID1A GIBBO'SA: Lovely little dwarf from the desert

country. Almost always in flower. Recommended. Purple flowers. 2 feet ................................................ 2/6’

shrub. . 1/6


203—PIMELEA L1NIFOLIA : 2 to 3 feet ................


Hardy dwarf white flowered


204— PITTOSPORUM PHILLYRAEOIDES: Butter Bush. A fine

small tree with graceful weeping habit. Hardy under hardest conditions. Scented creamy flowers followed by bunches of orange berries. 15 to 20 feet ............ 2/-

205— PITTOSPORUM UNDULATUM: Fine tree for coastal and

mountain areas. Scented flowers. 25 to 30 feet ...... 2/-

Covered with dense heads of spring. A desirable shrub. ........................................... 2/-


206—POMADERRIS ELLIPTIC A : small golden flowers in

4 to G feet ..........................

PROST’ANTHERA (Mint Bush)

.207—ALBA: A 8 feet


white-flowered semi-dwarf of pleasing appearance.

208—ASPALATHOI’DES: A beautiful very dwarf, red-flowering;

form from the dry inland. Will make an ideal plant to border the dwarf shrubbery. 1 foot ........................ 2/6

200—LINEARIS: A fine white-flowered form of the well-known Mint Bush. Suitable for the dry areas. 7 to 8 feet 2/-

210—N1VEA: The Snowy Mint Bush. White flowers. 6 bo 10

211—OVALIFOLEUM: The best of all the Mint Bushes. Deep purple flowers in spring. Needs watering in summer in dry areas. 8 feet ........... ...... -.....— ....................... 2/-

212— PU-LTENEA SUBTERNATA: A lovely little plant for a dry,

sandy corner. Orange and red flowers. 2 feet ...... l/'J

213— »STENOCARPUS SINUATA: Wheel Tree. Fine tree where

moisture is plentiful in summer time. Large, bTight

......... ......27-


plant with sprays

.......... .......... 1/6

Good shade and

........... ..... ..... 2/-

Slow growing at 6 to 8 feet 2/-


flowers. 30 feet ....................... ...........

214— SWAINSONA GALEGIFOLIA: Nice little

of pink flowers. 3 feet ..........- ............

215— SYNC ARPIA LAURIFOLIA: Turpentine.

specimen tree in coast areas. 40 feet 2145—TELOPEA SPECIOSISSIMA: Waratah.

first but worth a trial in any district.

217— -TEMPLETON!A RETUSA: A West Australian shrub with

brilliant red flowers. 4 to 6 feet .................. .......... 2/-

218— THOMASIA PETALOCALYX: Wren Flower. Nice West

Australian, almost ever-blooming dwarf. Lilac flowers.

2 feet .......................................-.............................. —......-    2/-

,219—TRISTANIA CONFERTA: Brush Box. Good avenue or specimen tree for coast or mountains or where frosts are not too severe. 20 to 30 feet .................................... 1/6

220— VIMINARILA DENUDATA: Golden Rain Tree or Australian

Broom. Yellow flowers on long, weeping branches. At best in damp position. 12 to 15 feet ....................... 2/-

221— WESTRINGIA LINIFOLIA: Hardy upright shrub for dry

areas. Light lavender flowers. 3 feet ........................ 2, -

222— WESTR1NGIA ROSMARLNIFORMIS: Australian Rosemary.

Nice little shrub. 4 to 5 feet. AVhite ........................ 2/-

223_XANTHORRHOEA ARBOREA: Grass Tree. Give a well-

drained position. Flower spike. 8 feet .................. 2/-

14

CREEPING AND CLIMBING PLANTS

224 BIGNONIA AUSTRALIS: Wonga Vine. Strong grower for

covering fences, etc. Likes stiff soil best .................. 1/6

— 5 CLEMATIS ARISTATA: A good quick-growing climber with

white, star-like flowers in spring ............................. 1/0

--6—CORAL BEAD CREEPER: (Species not known). Nice foliated creeper with striking black and red seeds showing

on the plant in autumn .................. ............................. 2/-

*27—GLYCINE CLANDESTINA :• Nice light creeper. Pale blue

174—

-HARDENBERGIA

ALBA. White ......

1/6

175—

-HARDENBERG IA

COMPTONIANA.

Blue.

1/9

176—

-HARDENBERGIA

MONOPHYLLA. Purple.

1/6

177—

-HARDENBERGIA

MONOPHYLLA

OV-

ATA .......................

• ...... ...... ...... ............

2/-

178—

-HARDENBERGIA

MONOPHYLLA

ROS-

EA ........................

2/-

(For

descriptions of above see general

list

of shrubs page).

228— KENNEDYA NIGRICANS: Black Bean of West Australia.

Without a doubt the best plant for covering unsightly fences, etc. Strong grower. Handsome foliage. Protect from frost during the first season. Peculiar black and yellow flowers .............................. -................................. 1/C

229— KENNEDYA RUBICUNDA: Red Bean. Not as strong a

grower as the preceding kind, but is a handsome plant. Red flowers ............................................................ ............ 1/5

230— PHYSIANTHUS Spp: Good, quick growing climber. Scented

white flowers ................................- ............................. 1/6

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST

This list contains novelties and plants of which 1 hold only a limited stock. Order early and avoid disappointment.


21

21

21

21-

feet.

2/6


231— ACACIA ROSSII: New West Australian kind. Dwarf.

232— ANGOPHORA CORDJFOLIA: Dwarf Apple. 15 feet.

233— ANGOPHORA SUBVELUTINA: 20 to 30 feet..................

234— BAUERA RUBIOIDES: Rock Rose. 3 feet ..................

235— BEAUFORTIA HETEROPHYLLA : Red Flowers. 4

(September) ................................................

236—BRUNONIA AUSTRALIS: Blue Pincushion. 9 ins.......    1/-

237—CALLISTEMON COCCINEUS: Red. 5 to 8 feet ..

2.38— CALLISTEMON VIRIDIFLORUS: Dwarf. 4 feet ..

2.39— CASTANOSPERMUM AUSTRALE: Bean Tree. 45

240— CIEN'FUGOSIA HAKEAEFOLIA: Desert Rose. 6

241— CR1NUM ANGUSTIFOLIA: Bulbous perennial ............ ......

242— DILLWYNIA JUMPERIXA: Yellow and brown. 2 feet

243— DIPLOLAENA ANGUSTIFOLI A :■ Lovely flower.

5 feet ......................- .— ................... —...........- ........

244— EREMAEA BEAUFORTIOIDES: Fine shrub. Red. 4 ft.

245— EREMOPHILA BIGNONIAEFLORA. Desert Fuchsia.

spotted purple. 12 feet ...............................-.........

246— EUCALYPTUS MACRORRHYNCHA: Stringybark. 50 ft

247— EUCALYPTUS    MINI AT A:    Vermilion flowered

50 feet ................- .....................-............................... —

FLORIBUNDA: Unique. Brown, yellow-

feet —............. ...................... -......................

HOOKERIANA: P'ine red flowers ............

BANKSII FORSTERil: Red. 6 to 10 feet HAKEA GRAMMATOPHYLLA. Red flowers. 10 feet

ISOPOGON ROSEUS: Red Cone Flower. 4 feet ............

•INDIGOFERA CORONILIFOLIA:    Fine


>


248— GREVILLEA

green. 5

249— GREVILLEA

250— GREVILLEA 251252253-


.. ...... 2/-

feet 2 -

feet......3 6

_______ 1 /-

1/6 Red. 3/6 2/6 Rose 2/6 1/6 Gum. 3/6 and 2/6 2/6 2/-2/6 2/6


25425525625725825926026126226326426526626726826927027 t-


dwarf.

Pink.

........... ...... ......

2/6

. 4 feet ......

2/-

Orange ......

2/-

10 feet ......

2/-

¡am. 8 feet

2/-

feet ............

2/6

flowers. 5 ft.

2/-

> feet ............

1/9

feet ............

2/-

••••••

2/-

Red.

2/6

2/-

1/6

1/6

2/6

red-

2/6

2/6

2/-

2/-


3 feet .........................................................

-LEPTOSPERMUM PERSICIFLORUM: Pink. -MARIANTHUS RINGENS: Lovely creeper. -MELALEUCA DECUSSATA: Lilac-purple. -MELALEUCA INC ANA: Fine dwarf. Cr -MELALEUCA PULCHELLA: Purple. 8 -MURRAYA EXOTICA: Sweet-scented white flowers. 5 ft. -PIMELEA LIGUSTRINA: Creamy white.

-PODOCARPUS ELATAr Plum Pine. 50

-PULTENEA Spp: Yellow. 3 feet ............

-REGELIA GRANDIFLORA:    Fine new dwarf.

(September) .................................................................. ......

-SOLLY A HETEROPHYLLA:    Blue flowered creeper

-STENOCHILUS LONGIFOLIA ..........................................

-SWAINSONA PROCUMBENS: Bluish flowers ............

-VERT1CORDIA INSIGNIS: Pink flowers. (Sept.) ............

-MELALEUCA MEGACEPHALA: New West Australian

flowering dwarf. 4 feet ................................................

-MELALEUCA TRICOPHYLLA: Rare. Red flowers. 4 ft.

-MORAEA ROBINSONIANA: Wedding Flower ...........

-LAGUNARIA PATERSONII: Pyramid Tree. Pink. 20 ft.


Ask for any plant not listed here, and if available, 1 will obtain same.

Seeds of many species are available. A list will be available about September to those making application.

10


ADVANCED PLANTS

Most of those plants listed in this catalogue may be had in gallon, 2 gallon and 4 gallon cans at prices ranging from 2/6 to 7/6.    -

Many of these plants are large enough to give an immediate effect and some will flower the first season. Order early to avoid disappointment.

FREIGHT AND POSTAGE

Freight and postage must be added to all remittances. Or freight payment may be made at receiving end if desired. Kindly add exchange to all cheques.

A small charge is made to cover cost of packing where cases and hessian are used. A small charge is also made for parcels to interstate and overseas destinations.

THE RANGERS’ LEAGUE OF N.S.W.

Is actively engaged in the Protection and Preservation of our native Flora and Fauna. ' One of our major activities is the

PREVENTION OF BUSHFIRES

We encourage the planting of nursery-grown Native Flora in home gardens.

Members are required, particularly in country districts. Minimum subscription, 5/- per year.

Write for a copy of “Bushland” magazine, price 1/6, plus 2d. postage, to The Organising Secretary, The Rangers* League, 28 Martin Place, Sydney.