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The Ovens Valley

THE Ovens Valle/ is at its scenic best between the Alps and Wangaratta, in north-eastern Victoria, where it runs north-west for about sixty miles, charmingly, peacefully, and with variety and colour. Old mining towns and quiet valley farms make deep contrast with high and often snowy peaks and the granite mass of Mt. Buffalo National Park. There are good trout streams and winter sports resorts. Nearby is a great and highly interesting hydro-electric scheme. There are extensive pine forests.

It is indeed a lovely valley. Motorists, walkers, horsemen, swimmers, fishermen and golfers take their pleasure and pastime therein with new aspects each returning day.

It is easily accessible. To get to Bright, the tourist “ capital ” of the valley and a pretty little town to boot, one takes train to the main line station of Wangaratta and then bus for 48 miles. Further information will be gladly given, and all bookings, including accommodation, made by the Victorian Government Tourist Bureau, Melbourne, or its branches in Geelong, Ballarat, Bendigo, Mildura, Sydney and Adelaide.

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All holiday costs shown in this booklet are those computed in 1954. They are, of course, liable to change. They do not include the cost of side excursions.

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XCELLENT ski-ing, in winter, may be had in the Alps, which close the south-eastern end of the Ovens Valley. During summer, alpine roads are negotiable by motorists and walkers. One of Victoria’s most interesting scenic roads crosses the Alps from Harrietville to Omeo (see lower picture, opposite page). There is a glorious alpine view, on a clear day, from Mt. Feathertop (opposite page, top). In the valley is Harrietville, where gold is being won by a dredge that weighs 5,000 tons, and is said to be one of the world’s largest (below). The hotel and the guest-house at Harrietville can together accommodate 52 ; and a week’s holiday there, including return transport from Melbourne, may be had for about £13. At Mt. Hotham, in the Alps, there is a guest-house and a ski club chalet. The guest-house tariffs range from £14-14-0 a week.



Bright


WINNER of an “ Ideal Town ” competition, Bright lies near the junction of the Ovens river and Morses creek. Its streets are shaded by trees that in autumn are especially beautiful. Bright is a convenient springboard for tours to the surrounding alpine country and (for the less adventurous) enjoyable walks along the river bank, through the pine forests, and to the Clear Spot on a nearby peak that yields rewarding views, particularly of the Buffalo plateau (see picture below and top of opposite page). Bright has a modern camping park, a children’s playground and facilities for golf, bowls and croquet. There are two hotels and two guest-houses with, all told, accommodation for 100, and furnished flats may be hired. Including return transport from Melbourne a week’s holiday at Bright may be had for about £12.


INE plantations are a distinctive feature of Bright. They spread over more than 8,000 acres, and are controlled by the Forests Commission of Victoria. The planting of these trees began in 1916, and some are now more than eighty feet high. Between five and six million super-feet of valuable softwood are produced each year. Pleasant hours may be spent in strolling through these forests and discovering unexpected views at almost every bend of the road. The river swimming pool (opposite page) is close to the town in the excellent camping park.



Beechworth


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TOURIST MAP

THE OVENS VALLEY


Railways Highways Main Roads


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HEEP may safely graze by Wandiligong roadsides, as the busy mining town of the ‘sixties has dwindled to a few cottages straggling along the road. In its heyday there were eight hotels and a school for three hundred children. Its peaceful valley, with its oaks and poplars, make Wandiligong a very attractive little “ghost town.” There is one hotel with accommodation for eight.


Bogong village and Lake Guy (shown below) are part of the State Electricity Commission’s Kiewa hydro-electric project. The roads to it are not open to general tourist traffic, but there are conducted coach tours.

OMINATING the mid-L*/ die part of the valley is the massive Mt. Buffalo. From its granite plateau, 4,500 feet high, one has almost breath-taking views over surrounding peaks and valleys. Perched near the edge of its steepest rampart is The Chalet, a large, modern guest-house with a very high standard of food, comfort and service.



It is a good winter sports’ resort and is also very popular at other seasons, especially in summer when the temperature is seldom higher than 75°. The cost of a week’s holiday at The Chalet, including return transport from Melbourne, ranges from £13.13.6.

ICTURED below are the hop-fields and kilns at Eurobin. They cover about 100 acres. The hops are picked in autumn and dried and cured in the kilns.



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YRTLEFORD, near the junction of the Ovens and Buffalo valleys, is another good jumping off point for tours. Roads connect it with the King and Kiewa valleys, Yackandandah and Beechworth.

The town has grass tennis courts, a golf course and a bowling green, and there is good trout fishing. The reserve on Nug Nug creek, 9 miles from the town, (see lower picture on opposite page) is popular with campers. There are three hotels, accommodating over 80. Return rail and road fares from Melbourne are £3.12.4 (first rail) and £3.0.6 (second rail).

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Wangaratta


WANGARATTA, a cathedral town of 7,000 people, is 145 miles from Melbourne and 45 from Albury. It has rayon, nylon, and woollen factories, and other secondary industries, and is the commercial and educational centre of a prosperous district. It is also a convenient and comfortable headquarters for exploring the valley as a whole. Wangaratta has attractive gardens, a natural swimming pool, a golf course, and grass tennis courts. It is, in fact, the capital of the north-east. There are ten hotels, with accommodation for more than 300. A week’s holiday at Wangaratta, with return transport from Melbourne may be had for about £10.



For all

Travel Information and Bookings

(Including Accommodation)

Consult . . .

The Victorian Government Tourist Bureau

272 Collins Street, Melbourne

Telephone: MF0202    ^

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Branches of the Bureau are at . . .

Sydney

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28 Martin Place ;

Adelaid e

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18 King William Street ;

Geelong

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City Hall, Gheringhap Street

Ballarat

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34 Lydiard Street North ;

Bend igo

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Charing Cross ;

Mild ura

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35 Deakin Avenue.

Published, May 1954, by the Victorian Railways Public Relations and Betterment Board, by direction of the Commissioners.