Souvenir.

Geelong West

PROCLAIMED A TOWN,

MARCH 22nd, 1922.


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PROCLAMATION OF GEELONG WEST

AS A TOWN

BY

His Excellency Colonel The Right Honorable The Earl of Stradbroke, K.C.M.G., C.B., C.V.O., C.B.E.,

Governor of Victoria, on the 22nd Day of March. 1922.


List of Mayors.



NAME.

YEAR OF ELECTION.

T. StONEMAN .

1875,1876, 1877

I. BOYNTON . .

1878

J. DONAGHY ..

1879, 1885

D. O’BRIEN .. ..

1880

E. HOPTON .. ..

1881

H. BANNISTER ..

1882, 1892,1898,1899,1900, 1901

W. S. HOBBS ..

1883

J. INCE......

18S4,1888

A. DICK......

1886

F. HODGES .. ..

1887, 1889, 1894

E. J. JONES .. ..

1890

H. SARGEANT ..

1891. 1895, 1896, 1897, 1898

C. W. DICKINS ..

1893, 1910, 1911

E. J. F. SAYERS ..

1902, 1903

F. J. BENNELL ..

1904, 1905

R. W. DALTON ..

1906

H. F. CHRISTOPHER

1907, 1908, 1909

H. T. D’HELTN ..

1912, 1913 .

G. J. SEARLE ..

1914 •

W. G. MADDEN ..

1915

J. HANCOCK ..

1916

J. A. BREGUET ..

1917

G. F. MORELAND

1918

B. ROSENBERG ..

1919

JAS. SHONE.. ..

1920

J.R. COXON.. ..

1921



H. R. H. FRENCH,

Present Town Clerk

List of Town Clerks.

NAME.

E. HOPTON ..    .

E. NETTELL W. HARRIS ..    .

H. BANNISTER . H. J. GIBBS ..    .

J. H. LESTER . H. R. H. FRENCH

YEAR APPOINTED.

1875

1877

1879

1903

1915

1916 1916

List of Surveyors.

T. M. GOODWIN..

1S75

E. NETTELL

1877

a. McWilliams

1879

J. R. TUFFS ..

1896

A. T. ANDREWS ..

1908


ME.MBF.RS OF THE. COUNCIL.

Back row, from left to right— Cr. J. T. Lewis, Cr. J. A. Breguet, J.P., Cr. Jas. Shone, Cr. J. D. Robertson.

Front row - Cr. F. J. Newberry, Cr. W. G. Madden (Chairman of Public Works & Markets), Cr. J. R. Coxon, J P. (Mayor), Cr. P. E.. Judd (Chairman of Finance), Cr. G. F. Moreland (Chairman of Parks and Gardens).



Cr. T. STONLMAN, First Mayor of the Borough.


Mr. P. H. 1 RICKE.TT,

38 Myers S'., Geelong, one of (he members of the Separation Committee in 1874.



HE Town of Geelong West originally com-h prised part of the Thompson Ward of the ill. || then Town of Geelong, and, in consequence ™ of the desire of its inhabitants to separate from the Town and govern their own local affairs, efforts to obtain separation were, according to minutes of the separation committee, commenced in the year 1863, when a public meet

ing. presided over by Mr. T. Davoren, was held in Kelly’s Grown Assembly Room, on the 19th of February of that year. At this meeting a motion was passed expressing the opinion of those present—that in consequence of the rising importance of Thompson Ward it should be formed into a separate Municipality, and thus have the power to govern its local affairs. It was further decided to endeavour to obtain the necessary legislative powers,


and a strong committee was formed to collect infoimation and take any necessary action in connection with the movement. A petition was presented to the Town Council conveying the motions passed at this meeting, and representations were also made to the members of Parliament for the district. Several public and committee meetings were held during the next two months, but, apparently, without any encouraging results, for no further records appear until the year 1869, when a further effort was made to obtain the power to separate. This effort also failed, and there were no other meetings until the 28th of July, 1874, when it was arranged to hold a public meeting in the St. George Hotel on the 3rd of August. The public meeting was presided over by Aid. J. Nixon, and amongst those who addressed the meeting were the Hon. (later Sir) Graham Berry,


OFFICERS OF THE COUNCIL..

Back row, lefl to right—Dr. F. J. Newman (Medical Officer of HealtFi), J. W. Smith (Health Inspector), W. H. Zimmer (Prosecuting Officer), A. T. Andrews (Surveyor).

Front row - E. E. Wilson (Solicitor), H. R. H. French (Town Clerk), Miss M. M. Westacott (Clerk and Typiste),

A. H. Madden (Treasurer).


M.L.A., who urged upon those present the necessity for combined action; also R. Dc B. Johnstone, M.L.A. 1 he following motion was unanimously carried,—“That it is the opinion of this meeting that the right of Separation from the Town of Geelong should be granted to Thompson Ward by Parliament, if requested by a majority of the burgesses and ratepayers.” A Committee of 54 was formed to draw up the petition and obtain signatures, and have same presented to Parliament.

These Committeemen decided to leave no stone unturned in obtaining a successful result; for, at their first meeting, they divided the Ward into small districts for canvass purposes, allotting the districts amongst themselves. They also arranged to obtain plans of the Ward showing the made and unmade streets. In two weeks’ time the Chairman of the Committee reported that 1020 signatures had been obtained to the petition, and on the 28th of August he reported that the petition had been presented to Parliament by the Hon. Graham Berry,

M.L.A. The Committee met almost every week about this time to receive reports and organise and direct the campaign which proved successful, for, on the 31st December, 1874, the Chairman of the Committee reported that the new Local Government Bill had been passed by Parliament, and the Ward had thus attained power to separate.

No time was lost in proceeding. A public meeting, with an attendance of 200 residents, was held in the St. George Hotel on the 12th of January, 1875, Mr. G. Gibson being the Chairman. It was unanimously decided that application be made by petition to have the Ward separated. The petition was prepared and signed within the next two months, and, on the 8th of March,

it was presented to the Chief Secretary by Messrs. •Graham Berry and R. Dc B. Johnstone, M’s.L.A.

The Order in Council constituting the Borough of Geelong West was passed on the 29th of May, 1875, and the following Councillors were appointed by Police Magistrate on the 7th August, viz:—J. J. Buckland, J. Nixon, D. O’Brien, and T. Stoneman. The first meeting of the Council was held on the same day, when Cr. T. Stoneman was elected Mayor.

Amongst those instrumental in achieving this result were the first elected Councillors, and Messrs. Robert Parkinson, P. Stirling, T. Davoren, Jas. Oddy. P. H. Trickett. W. Trickett, G. Gibson, W. Hunter, '1'. Shannon, 1. Hawkcs, Wm. Fynney, M. Treacey, Joseph

Taylor, G. Day, R. Hedley, T. Shekell, W. Dolley, Geo. Anderson, T. Craven, John Treacey, G. Thompson, W. Trethaway, T. Kelly, W. Lucas, R. W. Dunt, E. H. Taylor, John Taylor, - Walton, J. Donaghy, G. Wilson, T. Griggs, W. Ford, J. Molyneux, M. Donaghy, G. Gos-ney, J. Snowdon, J. Haines, W. Morgan, C. Outten, J. Audsley, W. List, J. Saunders, S. Clarke, G. Brunger, J. Patterson, J. J. Smith, J. W. Hotchin, G. Pettitt, J. Cressord, F. Moore, J. Buck, G. Trembling, J. Wood, W. J. Gough, S. Ross, J. Baxter, J. O'Meara, D. Smith, M. Smith, T. Robertson, P. McMahon, P. O’Brien and Dr. Howell.



STATISTICS RELATING TO THE MUNICIPALITY

Houses Valuation Revenue. 1085 £15,753    £2806

1102 £19,430    £3000

1483 £28,997    £3322

1500 27,983    £3104

1900    48,619    £7050

2200 £64,648 £10,500


Year. Assessments Population 1875 ... 1461    4577 (approx.)

1885    1433 4628

1895 ... 1992 6230 1905 ... 2004 6226 1915 ... 2547 8655 1922 ... 2800 9638

MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS.

The Town Hall Building was previously used by the late Mr. J. D. Mowbray as a school. The building, acquired immediately after separation, was afterwards altered and improved, and provision made for a Free Library therein. It might be mentioned that Mr. Mowbray was the first head teacher of Ashby State School, which has advanced in size and status until it now ranks as one of the principal state schools of Victoria, particulars of which are given herein. The Council, as opportunities have occurred, have purchased additional land in Albert Street, at the rear of the Town Hall, in order to cope with the municipality’s activities. On this land there has been erected an up-to-date residence for the use of the Council’s foreman, also stables, engine shed, concrete sheds, comprising storeroom, blacksmith’s shop, mixing room, and plant shelter.

MUNICIPAL MARKET BUILDINGS.

This building was erected by the Council about two years ago, and comprises 16 stalls, including a butcher’s shop. The market enables the producer to dispose of his produce to the best advantage, and affords the consumer an opportunity to purchase fruit, vegetables, produce, etc., under the most favorable terms and conditions.

WEST PARK PICTURE THEATRE.

This Theatre, with a seating accommodation for about 1200 persons, was established by the Council as an open air theatre in the year 1913, and was, after a period of about 2 years, roofed in. It has since been floored, artistically lined and brought up-to-date by the lessee upon his being granted a lease for 15 years. It has been recently sewered, and proper sanitary accommodation and appliances installed throughout.

The Council has reserved the use of theatre for municipal and other purposes on fixed days throughout the year.

PARKS AND GARDLN5.

The following Parks, Gardens and Reserves are held and maintained by the Council, viz:—

1.    West Park Gardens.

2.    Children’s Playground, Autumn Street.

3.    Railway Reserve, Latrobc Terrace.

4.    Children’s Playground. Madden Avenue.

5.    Cannon Hill Reserve on Foreshore.

6.    Sports Oval, Church Street,—area 9 acres.

ROAD CONSTRUCTION.

The length of road surface, whose maintenance is debited to the general revenue account, totals approximately 25 miles, with a metalled area of approximately a quarter of a million square yards. In every constructed street, channels, frequently of basalt pitchers with cement joints, have been laid for reception and conveyance of drainage.

The area covered by tar paved footpaths amounts to 76,192 square yards—nearly 16 acres.

PLANT AND MACHINERY.

The Council has been alive to the impossibility of constructing and maintaining roads, footpaths and channels without the aid of up-to-date and complete equipment, and implements and plant include amongst others :—

10-12 ton Invicta Road Roller.

Horse Roller.

Tar paving rollers.

Two Tar Carts (285 gals. each).

Street Water Wagon.

Street sweeper.

Street scraper.

Concrete Channel Roller.

Three horses and drays.

The street cleansing is efficiently carried out by day labor, and much of the improvements effected by the Council has been accomplished by the regular employees.

DRAINAGE.

At all times the foremost attention of the Council has been given to the most efficient methods of drainage, and though minor opposition was arrayed against the Council’s loan proposals for this object, time has justified, on the score of public health, the expenditure of large sums of money in channel construction throughout the municipality.

The main arterial storm-water sewer extends, in the southern area, from the West Melbourne Road to La-trobe Terrace, where the effluent traverses the City territory to the bay; and in the northern area, from Waratah Street along Pakington and Waterloo Streets, and by Griffen’s Gully Section to Latrobe Terrace whence it is continued to the bay.

Drumcondra and Lunan Estates have each their own systems of underground storm-water drainage.

PUBLIC UTILITIES.

WATER AND SEWERAGE

An adequate supply of water is provided by the Geelong Waterworks and Sewerage Trust, under which body the sewering of the Town is rapidly proceeding. The first sewerage area was proclaimed on the 1st April, 1916, since when provisions have been made to sewer 1795 properties, 1500 of which have been connected to the sewer.

The Town’s representative on the Trust is Commissioner H. F. Christopher, who was elected as the nominee of the Council in 1908. Afterwards in 1908, when additional powers were given to the Trust, constituting it under a special Act of Parliament, and granting powers to proceed with sewerage, Commissioner Christ-


THE. COUNCIL’S OUTDOOR STAFF.

Back Row (from left to right) J. Smith, F. Thornton, E. Wood, C. Stewart, A. J. Stewart.

Front row —M. Howlett, T. B. Johns, C. Winter (Foreman of Works), E. Paul (Curator), and C. Hudgell.


opher was' elected by the ratepayers, and has since retained that position. He was for 12 years a member of the Council, and held the position of Mayor for 3 years in succession.

TRAMWAYS.

Under powers conferred to the Melbourne Electric Supply Co. Ltd., and by agreement with the Councils concerned, the Company’s trams are operating in Aberdeen and Pakington Streets to and from the wharf and railway station. An extension of the service to North Geelong is to be proceeded with in the near future. The first tram entered the municipality on the 13th of March, 1912.

PUBLIC LIGHTING.

At the time the Borough was proclaimed, the streets were lighted by means of kerosene lamps; these were replaced by gas lamps in the year 1879, and in the year 1912 lighting by electricity was introduced. There arc 144 public and street lamps in use at the present time.

Extract from “The Geelong JUverliser” of fan. 16th, 1922.

PAKINGTON ST. DLVE.LOPME.NT.

As to the Borough itself, its most extraordinary feature is the development of Pakington Street, which is not a main road, but had to be fed for many years by people who came in along Kecra, Church, Autumn and Aberdeen Streets. As a result it has developed into the backbone of a decidedly prosperous suburb. At the time that Geelong West received its charter as a separate municipality, Pakington Street, which is now a very live business place, was practically without kerb, channels,

or footpath. The separation marked an epoch in the corporate aspirations of the people. Whatever progress Pakington Street could make meant the Borough’s progress, and, inspired with pride for their Borough, traders there encouraged and maintained the trade of Geelong West from Aberdeen Street in the south to Fisherman’s Gully on the north, West Melbourne Road and Manifold Heights on the west, and Latrobe Terrace on the east.

Less than 40 years ago school children in any part of the Borough could reach the then State School presided over by the late Mr. Mowbray, almost as the bird flics, owing to the vacant spaces—known in those days as the “greens”—where the stalwarts of a generation ago developed the tissue which marks the present generation. The area from St. James’ Street to Coronation Street was the arena for many fine football and cricket contests. To-day there is scarcely a vacant block to be found upon die area mentioned. Geelong West is one of the most thickly-populated places outside the metropolis, and is going ahead rapidly. This was indicated in the inspector’s report furnished to the Council on Wednesday last, when it was stated that the applications lodged within a couple of months for new buildings totalled 11 dwelling houses, 8 shops (all of which had been or were being erected in Pakington Street), and one shop and dwelling combined, whilst, in addition, applications had been received for improvements to be carried out to 13 different places.

RESIDENTIAL AREAS INCREASE.

With the exception of Donaghy’s Rope Works, Geelong West has not been regarded as a manufacturing district. It has been the residental area of an ever-increasing industrial community, and now that those areas east


Ashby State School (Established 1875). 1st Head Teacher, Mr. J. D. Mowbray. Present Head Teacher, Mr. J. J. Peart, B.A No. of Scholars on Roll, 1030


of Pakington Street have been thickly built upon, excellent prospects are afforded for residental advancement on the Heights in the vicinity of Elizabeth Street and West Melbourne Road. During the past decade phenomenal progress has been made in that area extending from Geelong and Melbourne railway to Corio Bay, where in quick succession the Harbor Estate, Drumcondra Estate, Lunan Estate, Glenleith Estate, and the Western Beach Estate, have advanced, constituting one of the finest residential areas in this State, with ideal drainage and proximity to the Bay.

Certainly the Borough councillors have not been backward in floating loans, but by their aid the council has been enabled to carry out innumerable works for the general improvement of the Borough, which may easily claim to be amongst the first of the municipalities as regards good drainage, footpaths, roads, and cleanliness.

NEW STATE SAVINGS BANK.

A commencement has been recently made with the erection of a new Savings Bank, which is to cost (exclusive of land) £3675. Messrs. Laird and Buchan are the architects, and Messrs. H. Beach and Sons are the contractors. The building is to be a substantial two-storied edifice, and will have spacious banking chambers with living accommodation for the manager. T he new bank will occupy a prominent position at the corner of Clarence and Pakington Streets, and is indicative of the increasing prosperity of the Town.

J.AIR.D £. bUCHAN Areh'fs    a a..:., o.n

[SAYINGS BANIYGEE1L0NG W.

Extract fromcC7>e Industrial Australian and ¿Mining Standard,' jdugust 26th, 1920.

M. DONAGHY & SONS PTY LTD., ROPE., HARVEST TWINE AND MAT WORKS.

Sixty-eight years ago, the late Mr. Michael Donaghy, shortly after his arrival from England, founded the first rope works in Victoria, at Marnock Vale, Geelong. In those days everything in connection with the industry was done by hand or leg-work, and a rope walk was really a rope-walk. The business prospered beyond the limits of its site, and in the early seventies a move was made to West Geelong, where five acres of land had been acquired. That area has since been considerably increased. In the meantime, steam propelled machinery had been installed, and to-day the great establishment fronting the main streets of West Geelong hums and vibrates with the rotation and thrust of many machines.

The present Company was incorporated in 1905. Two generations have passed away in the creation and development of the works; and Mr. Frank Donaghy, the grandson of the founder, and the son of John, now presides over the concern. So far, Australia has been able to supply, with minor exceptions, none of the raw materials required for rope and mat-making, although in the early days of her history attempts were made to cultivate the flax, or New Zealand hemp, as it is called. That article is imported from New Zealand; the abaca, or Manila hemp, from the Philippines; the coir yarn from India and the islands, and the sisal, a fibre from a species of the agave, from java and New Guinea. A good deal of linseed-flax is now being grown in Australia, particularly in Gippsland. Some is used at the works with highly successful results. Much of the Australian grown linseed-flax is exported. A large quantity was recently sold to the Belfast Rope Company, Ireland. The cultivation of this flax in Australia should have a big future. Sisal is now being cultivated in Queensland.

The initial treatment of some of the fibres produces an article so soft, silken and light in color that it might be likened to the tresses of a fair Saxon. Indeed, it would seem eminently suitable for making such a wig as would be worn on the stage by Marguerite in Faust.

The rope-walk is 2500ft. long, and when your correspondent visited the works, there had just been finished a splendid cable of extraordinary strength and beautiful workmanship.

The binder twine, “Kangaroo Brand,” is another branch of the industry, and is well known throughout the Commonwealth; the mat-factory, in which mats, of various and artistic designs, are made from the coir yarn, is

interesting to the visitor. In this particular factory, part of the work is performed by a large number of healthy, good-looking girls, whose skill and quickness arc remarkable.

The firm has its own engineering works, at which everything necessary for the repair and manufacture of its machinery, except the casting, is done. During the last ten years the factory has been remodelled and enlarged by fully a third, the number of hands by fifty to sixty per cent., and the turnover by upwards of fifty per cent. A staff of experts is constantly employed improving the machinery, and experimenting, with a view to perfecting methods and increasing production.

The business of the firm extends to all parts of the Commonwealth, and the Pacific Islands; it has also a large export trade to Europe and other parts of the world. The extent of the works at West Geelong may be gauged by the fact that 350 persons are employed there.

Geelong West is justly proud of this industry, which is a monument to the energy, perseverance and enterprise of its founder, and his successors.

The object of the Council in submitting this Souvenir is to place on record a brief history of the municipality, noting various present features reflecting the progressiveness of the district.

All available records have been carefully examined and checked before being committed to print, and the compiler takes this opportunity of thanking all those who have kindly given information and have otherwise assisted in the production of this souvenir.


PROGRAM of CPLLBRATION5 "



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22nd, 1922.

1    p.m. Luncheon to His Excellency the Governor of Victoria,

and Party, at A.B.C., Geelong.

2    p.m. Civic Reception to His Excellency at Town Hall, Geelong

West.

2.30    p.m. Proclamation of Geelong West as a Town by His Excellency

the Governor of Victoria.

3.30    p.m. Inspection of West Park Gardens and Tree Planting by His

Excellency and Party.

3.35 p.m. Picture Entertainment for School Children.

4.15 p.m. Inspection of Messrs. Donaghy & Sons’ Rope Works by Government Party.

7 p.m. Dinner at Town Hall.

SATURDAY, MARCH 25th, 1922.



Monster Sports Carnival at Geelong West Oval.

Printed by Henry Thacker, Pty. Ltd., Ryrie St., Geelong.

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