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FIBROLITE” WATER PIPES

for Water Supply and Irrigation



For over a quarter of a century, these durable mains have been successfully used for thousands of government, municipal, industrial and agricultural water supply installations throughout Australia and New Zealand. Made of cement and asbestos fibre, “Fibrolite” Asbestos-Cement High Pressure Water Pipes are immune to electrolysis . . . rust proof and resistant to corrosion. On the job, they are easily and quickly laid and jointed. No matter how large or small your proposed water supply or irrigation scheme . . . you will be assured of maximum efficiency and economy by installing “Fibrolite” Asbestos-Cement Pressure Pipes.


“FIBROLITE” SHEEP TROUGHING

A strong, permanent, rust-proof and economical sheep trough-ing. Light in weight, easy to handle and erect, and economical to transport. See page 11.

Sole Manufacturers:

JAMES HARDIE & COY. PTY. LTD.

(INC. IN N.S.W.)

‘‘ASBESTOS HOUSE,” Cnr. CITY ROAD and CLARENDON STREET, SOUTH MELBOURNE, S.C.5

P.O. Box 91, South Melbourne, Telephones: MX4711 (6 lines). Telegraphic Address: ‘'Fibrolite” South Melbourne.

AND AT SYDNEY, NEWCASTLE, BRISBANE, PERTH AND AUCKLAND

1st October, 1953

USE "FIBROLITE” PIPES FOR ALL WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS


Town and Urban Water Reticulation and Augmentation Schemes

The efficiency of “Fibrolite" Asbestos-Cement Pressure Pipes for use in major water supply schemes has been amply proven by the outstanding service they have given during the past twenty five years in hundreds of city, suburban and country water reticulation and augmentation schemes throughout Australia.

Irrigation — Orchards, Market Gardens, Golf Links, etc.

The advantages of “Fibrolite” Pressure Pipes that have led to their wide adoption by leading water supply engineers also commend them to pastoralists, graziers, agriculturalists, orchardists and market gardeners for their water supply systems . . . for irrigation by spraying or flooding, stock watering and for supplies to homesteads. Of importance to such users is the fact that “Fibrolite” Pipes can be easily and quickly laid and jointed without the aid of skilled labour, provided our standard laying instructions are adhered to. The “Fibrolite” Socket Joint (see pages 6 and 7) enables the pipes to be quickly coupled ... no lead, bitumen or other jointing materials being required to make a water-tight joint. Whilst the price of “Fibrolite” Pipes compares favourably with that of other approved types of pipes, many additional and substantial savings are effected in freight, handling, installation and other charges.

Industrial Water Supplies

In many major industrial and mining concerns throughout Australia, “Fibrolite” Pressure Pipes are giving efficient and economical service on numerous types of water supply installations. In this field, the pipes have been laid underground and, in some instances, fixed to external walls of factory buildings. In certain industrial plants it has been found that “Fibrolite” Pipes are resistant to destructive agencies that often shorten pipe-line life and necessitate costly maintenance and replacement expense. Economy in handling and installation are other advantages offered the industrial user.




“FIBROLITE" ASBESTOS-CEMENT PIPES

SIZES, WEIGHTS, ETC.


Nominal Dia. in Inches

Actual Internal Dia. in I nches

Test Head in Feet

Working Head in Feet

Approx.

Feet

per Ton

Rubber Ring Required *Code No.

2"

1 -96

700

350

650

R.J.30

3*

2-87

700

350

500

R.J.26

3" B.YV.

2-87

800

400

350

R.J.26

4"

3-92

400

200

330

R.J.8

V

3-58

800

400

250

R.j.7

4" B.W.

3-58

800

400

200

R.J.7

6"

5-86

400

200

170

R.J.16

6"

5-62

800

400

150

R.J.16

6" B.W.

5-62

800

400

100

R.J.16

8"

7-90

400

200

120

R.J.23

8"

7-40

800

400

90

R.J.23

9"

8-88

400

200

110

R.J.13

9"

8-38

700

350

75

R.J.13

* When ordering Rubber Rings, stale Code No.


-


Use “FIBROLITE” PIPES

CANNOT RUST OR TUBERCULATE

SMOOTH BORE

RESISTANT TO CORROSION

FREE FROM ELECTROLYSIS

For all Water Supply and Irrigation Schemes


LAYING AND JOINTING


“FIBROLITE”


PIPES


Easy to Lay and Joint : As distinct from other classes of pipe, “Fibrolite” Asbestos-Cement Pipes are easily and quickly laid and jointed without special skilled labour, provided the instructions given here are followed. Supplied in lengths of 13' 2.4" (5 lengths to the chain) “Fibrolite” Pipes are easy to transport, handle and lower into the trench. The “Fibrolite” Socket Joint helps to speed assembly and trenches can be kept to minimum width because caulking operations are not required with these pipes. Substantial savings are thus made in time, labour and materials.

Depth of Trench : It is recommended that “Fibrolite” Pipe be laid below ground. For town water supply schemes and where the pipe line is subject to traffic, a minimum cover of 24" is the accepted practice.

Where “Fibrolite” Pipes are used for irrigation purposes, the cover may vary from 2" to 12", depending on local conditions, but a minimum cover of 12" is advisable, especially where tractors and other farm implements are used.

Trimming of Trench: In laying “Fibrolite” Pipes the bottom of the trench should be trimmed to provide extra depth for the sockets so that the barrel of the pipe is supported evenly throughout its length and no undue weight is taken by the socket.

Anchoring: In cases where “Fibrolite” Pipes are laid above ground, each length of pipe must be anchored at each joint to prevent undue movement. When laid in trenches each change of direction (other than in the socket —see below) i.e., bends, tees, stop-ends, must be anchored with a concrete block before testing and filling the trench.

THE "FIBROLITE” SOCKET JOINT




The “Fibrolite” Socket Joint consists of a socket and spigot as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. The socket is manufactured of the same materials as “Fibrolite” Pipes and is fixed to one end of the pipe, the other end of the pipe being turned to form a spigot.

To make the joint, the rubber ring supplied is placed evenly and without twist in the groove at the spigot end of the pipe. The spigot end of the pipe, with the rubber ring attached is then placed against the chamfered end of the socket of the pipe to which it is to be jointed. The pipe must be in line before the spigot is pushed home in the socket. Having thus aligned the pipes, the spigot is pushed into the socket, causing the rubber ring to roll along the spigot and to be compressed by the socket into which it is forced. The spigot should be pushed right home into the socket to ensure that the shoulder of the pipe is completely within the socket, as shown in Fig. 2. The length of the spigot has been calculated so that the ring makes one complete revolution and comes to rest in contact with the shoulder of the spigot. This provides positive restraint for the ring and prevents blow-out from pressure.

The clearance between the socket and the spigot has been set to compress the ring to approximately 50% of its original diameter. Thus, when the joint is made, the pipe is floating on a ring of compressed live rubber.

Testing : After laying and jointing and prior to testing, the trench should be partially back-filled, leaving the sockets exposed. The line should then be filled with water and tested to the required pressure to ensure the correctness of thejointing. After testing, thetrench iscompletely back-filled.

Precautionary measure in making the FIBROLITE SOCKET JOIN



X Make sure that the spigot of the pipe, the rubber ring and the inside of the socket are dry. If necessary, dust with dry cement to ensure that no moisture is present, otherwise the rubber rings may skid instead of rolling.

2 Place the rubber ring in the groove in the spigot end and make sure that it is sitting freely and free from twists. If it is found that the ring is twisted when put into the groove on the spigot end, roll the ring up and down the spigot a few times to remove the twist.

3 Make sure that the pipes are in line before pushing the spigot end of the pipe into the socket of the adjoining pipe. It is advisable to push against the socket end of the DiDe. as it is


thus easier to keep the pipes in line. In pushing the spigot into the socket, a crowbar may be used for sizes up to 8" nominal diameter. To protect the end of the pipe during this operation, place a piece of timber between the pipe and the crowbar. For sizes larger than 8", a toggle or jack is necessary.

4 After the joint is made, check the position of the rubber ring to make sure that it is against the shoulder of the spigot. This may be done with a piece of hacksaw blade or feeler gauge. The compressed rubber ring should be resting against the shoulder of the spigot end and should be the same distance inside the socket all the way around.


MAKING “GIBAULT” JOINT



The “Gibault” Joint consists of a cast iron sleeve, two cast iron “Gibault” Flanges, two rubber rings, and the necessary cheese head bolts. The joint is made as follows :

1.    Place one “Gibault” Flange and one rubber ring on end of each pipe.

2.    Place cast iron sleeve on end of one pipe, butt pipes together, leaving about J" clearance for expansion, and adjust sleeve so that it is centrally situated over ends of pipes.

3.    Draw “Gibault” Flanges over sleeve, insert bolts and screw up spanner tight, thus compressing the rubber rings against the ends of the cast iron sleeve and making a watertight and semi-flexible joint.

In cases where it is necessary to replace a pipe in an existing line, the replacement pipe is connected into the line by means of a “Gibault” Joint.

CAST IRON FLANGE










BENDS, TEES AND SPECIAL FITTINGS


Cast Iron Bends, Tees and Connectors, as illustrated, are supplied for use with “Fibrolite” pipes. Also Crosses, Reducers and Stop Valves, etc., are available. All these Fittings are made with spigot ends and are connected to the “Fibrolite” pipes by means of Gibault Joints. The joint between the cast iron fittings and “Fibrolite” pipe is made as indicated on Page 8.

“Fibrolite” pipes can be cut with a hacksaw. Should it be necessary to cut a pipe to instal a cast iron fitting in the required position in the line, the end of the pipe may need rasping down to take the cast iron flange of the Gibault Joint.

Anchorage should be provided for all blank ends, bends, tees, and, in fact, all points where uneven water pressure is likely to be exerted.


IRRIGATION FITTINGS


IRRIGATION OUTLET

The irrigation outlet, as illustrated, consists of a base and a riser containing a spring loaded valve. The flow of water is controlled by means of an irrigation hydrant which is fitted to the outlet as described below.



IRRIGATION HYDRANT

The irrigation hydrant connects the temporary spray line to the irrigation outlet which is inserted in the “Fibrolite” supply line. Hydrant is fitted with a spindle which opens and closes the irrigation outlet as required, acting in a similar manner to hydrant used with fire services. The irrigation hydrant is designed so as to permit the spray pipe to be easily swung in any direction desired.

Illustration on right shows irrigation hydrant inserted in irrigation outlet and connected to spray pipe. Mouth of hydrant is fitted with a companion flange, as ordered, to fit type of spray pipe to be used.



SERVICE CONNECTIONS


Provision for service connections for “Fibrolite” Asbestos-Cement Pipes is made byusing either Tapping Bands or Elongated “Gibault” Joints, as described hereunder.


TAPPING BAND

When it is necessary to tap mains under pressure, service connections are made by means of a tapping band, as shown in Fig. 3.

This fitting is recommended and supplied only when the size of the tapping is f" or 1" in the case of 2" pipes, up to li" for 3" pipes, and up to 2" for all larger size “Fibrolite” pipes. It is not recommended that larger tappings be taken from the main using the tapping band. The tapping band comprises two cast iron saddles, two bolts and one moulded rubber washer, the saddle being clamped to the “Fibrolite” pipe by the bolts, as illustrated. The top saddle is drilled and tapped to take the service pipe and is sealed to the “Fibrolite” pipe by means of the moulded rubber washer. It is therefore only necessary to drill through the wall of the “Fibrolite” pipe and screw the service cock or pipe into the saddle. It is advisable to keep the hole drilled into the “Fibrolite” pipe as small as possible, preferably a j" below the tapping size.


ELONGATED “GIBAULT” TAPPING JOINT

This joint cannot be used for making service connections under pressure. In laying new pipe lines, the tapping joints can be placed at desired intervals and plugged until such time as the service connection is required.

This fitting is similar to the standard “Gibault” Joint, the only difference being in the elongated sleeve. This sleeve is bossed to a sufficient height to ensure that the elbow from the service cock is clear of the flanges, and is supplied drilled and tapped in the centre. Fig. 4 illustrates the service cock screwed into the joint.

The complete joint for service connection comprises two cast iron “Gibault” flanges, two moulded rubber rings, one elongated cast iron sleeve drilled and tapped for service connection, and the necessary cheese head bolts.

STOP-ENDS charged at the equivalent of one foot of troughing.



“FIBROLITE” SHEEP TROUGHING


Supplied in 8' lengths.

PROOF AGAINST RUST AND CORROSION WHITE ANT AND BORER PROOF DOES NOT REQUIRE PAINTING KEEPS WATER COOLER IN SUMMER EASILY ERECTED BY UNSKILLED LABOUR


UNAFFECTED BY WEATHER DURABLE . . . IMPROVES WITH AGE CLEAN AND HYGIENIC NO CREVICES TO HARBOUR VERMIN LIGHT IN WEIGHT—EASY TO TRANSPORT




It is advisable, but not essential, to set the troughing on concrete blocks, as shown in illustration above. These blocks should be approx. 6" wide and let into the ground about 3" or 4".


ERECTION OF TROUGHING

JOINTING: Units are bolted together with four 1J" x l" brass bolts. For 15" x 9" Troughing, use two bolts in bottom of trough and one on either side; for 20" x 10" Troughing, space bolts at approximately 9" centres. A length of I" rubber cord is inserted in the joint where indicated on diagram, the cord being of sufficient length to allow ends to project about 1" above each side of trough. Seal inner and outer seam of joint with clay or putty; cut off projecting ends of rubber cord and fill in joint with hot (not boiling) bitumen.


Trouble-proof pipes mean real economy on water transportation systems. And hundreds of installations all over Australia and New Zealand are proving the exceptional ability of Hardie “FIBROLITE” Asbestos-Cement High Pressure Water Pipes to bring operating costs to new low levels. Delivery capacity stays up .. . maintenance costs down.


Here are a few of the advantages offered you by “Fibrolite” Pipes . . .

•    RUST PROOF . . . RESISTANT TO CORROSION

•    IMMUNE TO ELECTROLYSIS

★ • FREE FROM TUBERCULATION

•    EASILY AND QUICKLY LAID AND JOINTED

•    LOW MAINTENANCE

* Because the initial high flow co-efficient of “Fibrolite” Pipes (C135, Hazen-Williams formula) cannot be reduced by tuberculation, delivery capacity stays high and pumping costs remain permanently low. In many cases smaller diameter pipes may be used and longer systems installed for the same outlay of expenditure, because it is not necessary to allow for steadily decreasing capacity due to tuberculation.

Because of the flexibility of the Fibrolite” Socket Joint (see page 6), “Fibrolite” Pipes can be laid around curves with a deflection of up to 5°.

MADE IN AUSTRALIA SOLELY BY JAMES HARDIE & COY. PTY. LTD

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JAMES HARDIE & CO. PTY. LTD., MELBOURNE, SYDNEY, BRISBANE, PERTH and AUCKLAND, N.Z. . Phone MX 4711

500 Stuart Taylor Ref. 6324 6'54