WHOOPING

COUGH

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for the Benefit of its Policyholders

Whooping Cough

THE

DANGER OF

WHOOPING

COUGH


Do you consider Whooping Cough to be a disease of little importance? If you do, rid yourself of the idea at once, for Whooping Cough is a highly contagious and dangerous disease.

The large numbers of deaths that occur through Whooping Cough are due generally to complications (that is other diseases which appear at the same time) and diseases which follow immediately after, so that Whooping Cough is something that no parent can treat lightly. For instance, in the Commonwealth during the seven years ending 1919, there were four times as many deaths from Whooping Cough as Scarlet Fever, and twice as many as from Measles.

PREVENTION


One of the most important things to do when Whooping Cough is about is to keep your children away from other children, for the disease may be caught both from those suffering from it and infected things that they have handled.

Whooping Cough attacks chiefly those between the ages of six months and five years. After five years the older the child is the less chance there is of catching it. Second attacks are rare; the first attack giving long immunity.

Whooping Cough may be divided into three periods.

SYMPTOMS

OF

WHOOPING

COUGH


The First Period.

The child appears to be ill and shows the usual signs of cold. There is always more or less cough. This stage usually lasts anywhere from four to 14 or 20 days. However, Whooping Cough is difficult to detect at this time as the child may only have a cold or slight bronchitis. A careful observant mother will, if the child is getting Whooping Cough, notice that the cough is getting worse and occurs “ in spells,” is worse at night, and presently the “ whoop ” is noticed, which shows

The Second Period

has arrived. This lasts from about four to six weeks. The cough comes on in the form of a number of short coughs followed by a long “ whoop.” The eyes bulge, the face becomes purplish, and the eyes run. This is because of the great exertion. Often the child vomits after the attack is over. The number of these attacks vary during the 24 hours. The child always sits up to cough and sinks back exhausted when the attack is over. It suffers a great deal during the attack and will do its best to stave it off. The attacks are most numerous and most severe at night, waking the child at intervals. Usually the child sleeps between attacks.

TREATMENT

OF

WHOOPING

COUGH


£ f>


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The Third Period.

The attacks now become fewer and fewer until they cease altogether (sometimes, however, the cough persists through sheer habit) and the child regains health speedily.

Follow the doctor’s instructions exactly. Give plenty of good, nourishing food and plenty of fresh air. Don’t allow the patient to mix with other children. All matter that comes from mouth and nose during the time the child is sick should be received on pieces of old clean rag and burned. Separate plates, cups, glasses and spoons must be kept for the child suffering from Whooping Cough. Take great care of the child for several months after the attack of Whooping Cough has passed off. Whooping Cough must be notified to the Health Authorities in South Australia, but in no other State.

W.s. 9.