DEEP

WATER

PORT


RICH

AGRICULTURAL DISTRICT .




TOURIST

RESORT

INDUSTRIAL

CENTRE


COMPILED BY

BURNIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE





«

This brochure was compiled and issued by the Burnie Chamber of Commerce.

The Secretary, P.O. Box 139, Burnie, will be pleased to furnish further information.

(Burnie

Is the third largest centre of population in Tasmania, being surpassed only by Hobart and Launceston. The 1948 census showed the population of the Municipality to be 10,084. Owing to industrial expansion, the population is increasing rapidly. The suburbs of Montelio, Upper Burnie, Hillcrest, Brooklyn, Wivcnhoe, South Burnie, Parklands and Cooee are sharing in the general progress.

Burnie was named after William Burnie, who was a director of the Van Dieman’s Land Company in 1832. The town area was originally portion of an Imperial Grant to the V.D.L. Co.

The Burnie Municipal boundaries encompass 133,500 acres, which include excellent forests and some of Tasmania’s richest agricultural land. The chocolate soil produces an abundance of the renowned Tasmanian Brownell and Bismarck potatoes; fine pastures ensure the success of dairy production, and fodder crops are grown with marked success. The land produces vast wealth. Most holdings are used for mixed farming, and the men on them are competent and successful farmers.

The Burnie Municipality is administered under the Local Government Act, 1906. The four wards—North, South, Stowport and Hampshire—each elect three members of the Municipal Council.

Burnie is aptly known as "The Front Door of Tasmania,” because of its proximity to Australian mainland ports and because it is the only deep water port in Northern Tasmania with direct rail access to all parts of the State. Among others, P. and O.. Orient, Port, Shaw Saville and Albion, and Aberdeen Line vessels visit the port.

COMMUNICATIONS

The aerodrome for Burnie is at Wynyard— 12 miles away. A.N.A. and T.A.A. passenger and freight planes maintain convenient daily services between Wynyard and Melbourne. The ’drome is an excellent one, and has recently been improved and expanded to meet the requirements of the growing popularity of air travel. Approximately £50,000 has been expended by the Department of Civil Aviation on these recent improvements.


Road and rail services radiate daily from Burnie to all parts of the State, including the important West Coast mining centres of Rosebery, Zeehan and Queenstown.

Burnie and its suburbs are served by modern, well-conducted bus services.

ELECTRIC POWER

Electric light and power are supplied by the State HydroElectric Commission which, with the expansion programme now in hand, will have abundant power supply for industry. Power lines have been extended into most country areas in the Municipality.

AMENITIES

Burnie provides all the amenities which are typical of a progressive, expanding centre. The town and most suburbs are sewered and the sewerage scheme is being extended.

The Burnie Theatre has seating capacity for 1100 persons. There are also a smaller theatre (The Vogue), Town Hall, and public halls in suburban and rural districts.

EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES

In addition to State and Convent primary schools, higher education is provided by the State High School and a Technical College.

Branches of the State Free Library and the Lady Clark Memorial Children’s Library function. The Free Library serves the whole Municipality.

WATER SUPPLY

The sources of the Burnie water supply are from the Emu River by pumping plant and by gravitation from Romaine Creek. Supply from both passes through large service reservoirs and is chlorinated.

The supply is adequate for present demands up to a maximum consumption of 200 gallons per day per capita. Extensive surveys have been made of both gravitation through large storages and pumping through filters to determine future methods of supply. The aim is for an assured quantity and quality of water for the next 30 years’ expansion of the town demand, and preliminary steps have been taken to bring about major developments with this end in view.


urnie

HOLIDAY CENTRE

All that holiday makers could desire is to be found in the Burnie district. There are lovely beaches at West and South Burnie. The West Beach, flanked by Hilder Parade, is the headquarters of an efficient Surf Life-Saving Club. There are other ocean beaches within easy reach of Burnie.

Surfing, golf, tennis, bowls, croquet, cricket and all the usual winter sports have made Burnie popular as a sporting centre. There are excellent picnic grounds in the country, and many preny scenic drives. Hundreds of visitors are attracted to Burnie each year because there they find all they could desire to contribute to a happy, restful, health-giving holiday.

The Tourist and Progress Association (Mr. H. Roberts, secretary, Cunningham Street) is able to supply information to intending visitors.

DAIRYING

The dairying industry is expanding rapidly. In 1948-49 butter production by factories in the district were:—

Tons.

North-Western Co-operative Dairy Co. Ltd. 384

Table Cape Butter Factory......... 280

Yolla Dairy Co. Ltd............... 123

Cadbury-Fry-Pascall Pty. Ltd. purchase from producers large quantities of whole milk, which is processed at the company’s plant at Cooee (1 mile from Burnie) before it is conveyed to Claremont for use in the production of chocolate.

The conservation of fodder is claiming increased attention among farmers.

STOCK

For 1947-48, 8637 pigs were yarded at the Cooee sa'eyards, compared with 7254 the previous year.

(Continued)

There were 8180 bacon pig carcases processed at the Somerset works of the N.W. Freezing and Canning Co. The previous year’s total was 8500. Pig production is at present affected by a shortage of foods, pig netting and building materials. When these are available the industry should expand rapidly.

Fat cattle production is an important unit of farm

economy.

BURNIE PUBLIC HOSPITAL

The provision of a large, modern hospital at Burnie, which will soon be an accomplished fact as the buildings are well under way as this publication goes to press, will supply Burnie with another amenity indispensable to a thriving, growing centre. The main hospital block and the nurses’ home are fast taking shape on the seafront on Marine Terrace, South Burnie.

For many years Burnie has been well served by the Spencer Memorial Hospital at Wynyard, 12 miles from Burnie. This fine, large institution, and the Spencer Maternity Hospital, have been of inestimable value, and will continue to meet the needs of a very large area.

The main two-storey block of the Burnie Public Hospital makes provision for 57 beds. Also there will be a large nursery. The casualty block includes an outpatients’ clinic, an ante-natal and post-natal clinic. There will be a large lecture-room and amenities, as well as a kitchen and laundry block.

The Nurses’ Home provides for a lounge, matron’s suite, sub-matron’s suite and 8 bedrooms for nurses on the ground floor and 10 on the first floor. An extension will accommodate 16 additional nurses and provide for a large dining-room, Utchcn, sitting-room and rooms in which visitors may be entertained.

Plans have also been approved for a clinic for immunisation and preventive treatment. Provision has also been made for a dental clinic.


Paper manufactured at Burnie, which in value amounts to nearly £2,000,000 per annum, is distributed throughout the Commonwealth by sales to wholesale paper merchants, who in turn sell to Government departments, printers, stationery manufacturers, etc. The principal qualities produced are machine - finished and super - calendered printings, cream laid and cream wove writings and bond, but the range includes also smaller quantities of such qualities as blotting, duplicator and offset printing and azure laid ledger. When plant extensions now in hand are completed, the mill will also make machine-coated papers and bank.

About 900 people are employed at present, but with the expansion of the industry now in hand this number will be greatly increased. In addition contractors supplying timber from the forests employ about 250 cutters and carters, of whom more will be required as timber demand increases. Originally a nucleus of employees, experienced in pulp and papermanufacturing was brought from England, but of these, few now remain, and to-day the industry is almost entirely manned by Australians who have gained their knowledge and experience in Australian mills.

Associated Pulp &C Paper Mills Ltd. of Burnie is one of Australia’s leaders in the field of employee welfare activities, the administration of which is controlled almost entirely by the employees themselves. Funds are provided partly by employee contributions and £ for £ Company subsidies, and partly by a

Paper Machine Room.

Bonus on Production agreement between the Company and a Council elected by the employees, under which the Council receives a revenue of £1 for every ton of paper produced in excess of 16,000 tons a year. Activities in operation include Medical Fund, Sickness and Accident Fund, Employees’ Life Assurance, Dental Clinic, Optical Benefits, Pre-natal Care, Domestic Sickness Fund, Hard Luck Fund, Scholarships for employees’ children, Annual Picnic and Children’s Christmas Party. Employee sporting clubs also function under the aegis of the Council, and of these both Football and Cricket Clubs have won the district premierships.

The Services Building which is really the home of employee activities, is a particularly well-appointed building, containing, in

addition to offices, dental clinic, first-aid rooms, gymnasium, etc., and a magnificient myrtle-floored dance hall, which is by far the best in the district. During working days this hall is used as a cafeteria, in which hot meals are supplied to employees at cheap rates.

With its well-kept lawns and gardens and its unique setting on the main highway, which runs right alongside the beach, the Burnie paper mill is one of the most attractive factories in the Commonwealth.

E


.. :

Mil


E


Finishing Room.


The Three Piers, viewed from South-East


OCEAN WHARF —Left of photograph.

Shore End — S.S. "Woniora.”

Sea End — S.S. "Alabama.”

McGAW PIER — Centre of photograph.

North Side —S.S. "J. E. B. Stuart.” South Side — S.S. "Kekerangu.”

JONES PIER — Right of photograph.

North Side — S.S. "Coolana.”

South Side — S.S. "Tambar.”


823

gross

tons.

205

feet

long.

7004

gross

tons.

442

feet

long.

7 196

gross

tons.

442

feet

long.

3 146

gross

tons.

342

feet

long.

2 197

gross

tons.

295

feet

long.

456

gross

tons.

160

feet

long.


(The Potato Industry

No branch of the primary industry has brought more wealth to the district than has the growing of potatoes. The soil and climate in Northern Tasmania are all that could be desired for potato production, and Tasmanian Brownell and Bismarck varieties are known all over Australia.

In the Burnie district there are hundreds of acres of the best potato land.

Bismarcks are the early-growing variety, but Brownells predominate. Planting of Bismarck seed commences in June, and Brownells are planted from July till as late as November. The conditions are so suitable that it is almost a common practice to plant in September and dig in November of the following year. When it is possible to hold potatoes in the ground for up to 15 months there is little need for storage facilities.

Although Sydney market is available to all States, Tasmania supplies approximately 60 per cent of Sydney’s potato requirements, and a big proportion of these exports leave Burnie

wharves. The high quality of the Tasmanian product is emphasised by the fact that, under free marketing conditions, Tasmanian potatoes always enjoyed a premium of from £1 to £2 per ton.

Export of potatoes (which is mainly from Burnie and and adjacent N.W. Coast ports) average between 3,000,000 and 1,250,000 sacks. Before the war between 32,OOf and 36,000 acres of potatoes were grown annually. *

Under war-time conditions up to 3,000,000 sacks were exported in a year when the industry was at its zenith. The return to growers was approximately £3,000,000,

Shipping Potatoes to Sydney.


Twenty-odd years ago expert opinion held that satisfactory paper could not be made from the short fibres of the Australian eucalypts. Nevertheless a small band of enthusiasts persisted with painstaking research, and to-day the Burnie mill, another at Boyer, in Southern Tasmania, and still another at Maryvale, Victoria, bear witness to their patience and their faith in ultimate success.

Production of paper at Burnie commenced in August, 1938, with one 200-inch paper machine, to which a smaller 90-inch machine was shortly added.. Thus when war broke out the following year Australia was able to rely very largely on local resources for supplies of essential fine printing and writing papers. Not only were Commonwealth and State Governments supplied from Burnie during the war, but large tonnages also went to the American Army and to our own Navy, Army and Air Force — thus the newly-fiedged Australian paper industry went to war.

The Burnie mill’s current output of 25,000 tons per annum is being increased to 35,000 tons by the addition of a fourth paper machine of 120-inch width, manufacture of which is now nearing completion in England. Necessary additions are also being made to the pulp mill and subsidiary plant. The Company owns large forest areas south of Burnie and in the Far North-West of the island, and has certain concession areas, but to date most of its wood supply has been drawn from other privately-owned lands. To ensure balanced and continuous production and reproduction from the timber areas,

a hardboard mill, w’th an annual output of 10,000 tons, is being added to the papermaking plant, and a long-range, vigorous forest policy has been put into operation. A large modern sawmill is also to be erected to cut high-quality building timber for sale, and to supply sawn billets for the pulp mill and hardboard mills, so that the products of the forest may be put to their most appropriate uses. Further expan sion contemplates the supply of eucalyptus pulp to an adjacent paper mill to be erected in association with the British firm of Thomas Owen 6c Co. Ltd. to make vegetable parchment, grease-proof, glassine and similar papers. The paper industry at Burnie, already large, thus promises to become one of Australia’s major enterprises within the next few years.


Paper manufactured at Burnie, which in value amounts to nearly £2,000,000 per annum, is distributed throughout the Commonwealth by sales to wholesale paper merchants, who in turn sell to Government departments, printers, stationery manufacturers, etc. The principal qualities produced are machine - finished and super - calendered printings, cream laid and cream wove writings and bond, but the range includes also smaller quantities of such qualities as blotting, duplicator and offset printing and azure laid ledger.

When plant extensions now in hand are completed, the mill will also make machine-coated papers and bank.

About 900 people are employed at present, but with the expansion of the industry now in hand this number will be greatly increased. In addition contractors supplying timber from the forests employ about 250 cutters and carters, of whom more will be required as timber demand increases. Originally a nucleus of employees, experienced in pulp and papermanufacturing was brought from England, but of these, few now remain, and to-day the industry is almost entirely manned by Australians who have gained their knowledge and experience in Australian mills.

Associated Pulp 6c Paper Mills Ltd. of Burnie is one of Australia’s leaders in the field of employee welfare activities, the administration of which is controlled almost entirely by the employees themselves. Funds are provided partly by employee contributions and £ for £ Company subsidies, and partly by a

Paper Machine Room.

Bonus on Production agreement between the Company and a Council elected by the employees, under which the Council receives a revenue of £1 for every ton of paper produced in excess of 16,000 tons a year. Activities in operation include Medical Fund, Sickness and Accident Fund, Employees’ Life Assurance, Dental Clinic, Optical Benefits, Pre-natal Care, Domestic Sickness Fund, Hard Luck Fund, Scholarships for employees’ children, Annual Picnic and Children’s Christmas Party. Employee sporting clubs also function under the aegis of the Council, and of these both Football and Cricket Clubs have won the district premierships.

The Services Building which is really the home of employee activities, is a particularly well-appointed building, containing, in

addition to offices, dental clinic, first-aid rooms, gymnasium, etc., and a magnificient myrtle-floored dance Kali, wKich is by far the best in the district. During working days this hall is used as a cafeteria, in which hot meals are supplied to employees at cheap rates.

With its well-kept lawns and gardens and its unique setting on the main highway, which runs right alongside the beach, the Burnie paper mill is one of the most attractive factories in the Commonwealth.


_______......:__________________

Wilson Street — Principal Shopping Centre

/


^Radio Station 7 BU

Burnie was granted one of the early licences for broadcasting stations in Tasmania, and has in its local commercial station 7BU a fine asset.

Town and station have grown together; the latter assisting in no small way, not only with Burnie’s development, but in a wider sphere, with the progress of the whole of the North-West Coast, particularly with its assistance to the farmer, whose products contribute so largely to the wealth of the district.

Since its inception 7BU has had as its General Manager a tireless worker for charity and the man on the land in A. D. Towner, Esq., M.B.E., who has been recently decorated for his work in these fields.

The programmes of 7BU eminate from studios in Wilson Street, and are broadcast from a modern transmitter, which. was in fact itself completely designed and constructed in the station’s workshops in Burnie, under the direction of Mr. Tas. Lord, A.M.I.R.E., Assistant Manager and Chief Engineer, who has been associated with 7BU since the station’s inception.

Each morning, Monday to Saturday, transmission commences at 6.30, and continues throughout most of the day until close down at 10.30 p.m.

Almost all important National advertisers make very full use of the commercial possibilities offered by this modern sales medium; while many local advertisers pay personal tribute to the assistance rendered by 7BU in building up their businesses.

Special attention is given to sports activities trom the station, while one of the most-Iistened-to sessions is the 10 to 11 programme on Sunday mornings, in which a host of chetrios are regularly sent to and from sick folk in hospitals spread throughout the State and Victoria.

The Sunpolishers’ Club, as the Station’s Children's Club is known, boasts a membership of 12,100 children, all of whom are pledged to "Brighten the Lives of Others.” In fact, it might be truly said that this is the aim and policy of the station, and its staff of 10.

Free time is provided for the churches. Particularly during the war period, 7BU took a leading part in the raising of local loan quotas.

In short, it was established to give service — and wherever and whenever it can lend a helping hand the Burnie Station 7BU is on the job.

West Park Oval

It is on this fine sporting ground that the Burnie Athletic Club conducts its big carnival annually on New Year s Day. Because of the liberal prize money paid the Burnie Carnival is known throughout Australia. The Burnie Gift is worth £250 and the Burnie Wheel Race £250.

Since 1913 the Club has missed conducting only three carnivals (on account of the war). A couple of modified programmes were conducted.

The importance of the carnival may be gauged from the following achievements since 1913:—

Gate receipts, approximately £30,000; share of profits paid to the Burnie Council for ground improvements, approximately £10,000; spent on ground improvements, £1,333; patriotic funds, £1,257; paid in prize money—cycling, £6,000; pedestrian, £6,000; bands, £4,000; other prize money, £2,000.

(Plan of the Port


J.K.E.

3l-3-4«


SCALE

100 00

bmrrnrb

MARINE BOARD OF BURNIE PORT OF BURNIE

400 FT

TASMANIA

X Stefff&'ty-* RESIDENT ENGINEER

^Proposed Port Development


— PROPOSED PORT DEVELOPMENT —


MARINE BOARD OF BURN IE PORT OF BURNIE TASMANIA

W*Af RESIDENT ENGINEER

»

CAustralian Titan

Situated amid pleasant bush scenery and fronting Bass Highway four miles from Burnie is the modern works of Australian Titan Products Pty. Ltd., where are manufactured titanium dioxide pigments for use in the paint, lacquer, enamel, paper, plastics, linoleum, porcelain and many other industries.

Australian Titan Products Pty. Ltd. is a subsidiary of British Titan Products Co. Ltd., of England, who own and operate two large plants at Billingham and Grimsby engaged in the manufacture of a complete range of Titanium pigments distributed throughout the British Empire.

The Burnie works, the first unit of which was completed in November, 1948, will, when finally completed, have a capacity in excess of the present total requirements for Titanium pigments ot the Commonwealth.

The buildings and plant were erected to plans and specifications supplied by the parent company suitably modified to meet local conditions, and are the most modern in the industry.

The buildings are laid out on a rectangular plan with concrete roads, and comprise the following blocks: office and canteen, workshops and store, laboratories, boiler station with pump house and electricity sub-station, process building where manufacture takes place.

The offices, canteen and workers’ change and ablution block are surrounded by extensive lawns and flower beds.

A private siding is connected to the main N.W. Coast line, enabling ore, acid, fuel oil, coal and stores to be discharged directly to storage tanks or bunkers as received from the Port of Burnie or Hobart, or local coal mines.

Raw water is supplied from a reservoir (constructed by the Company) at Chasm Creek, and is piped one and a quarter

Products Pty. Ltd.

miles to the site where it is purified in a modern plant to render it suitable for works purposes and drinking.

Electric power is taken from the H.E.C. at 22,000 volts and transformed on the site to working voltages for the 180 motors varying from 1 h.p. to 140 h.p.

Titanium pigments are obtained by the solution of the black mineral Ilmenite, an oxide of iron and titanium, in sulphuric acid following extensive treatment of the solutions to remove impurities and to precipitate the titanium oxide in suitable form. This precipitate is washed to remove impurities, treated with a variety of chemical agents, heated to nearly 1,000 degrees centigrade to confer on it the pigmentary properties, after which it is ground to an exceedingly fine powder.

Titanium dioxide is intensely white, the strongest of all white pigments.

The method of manufacture involves very many stages, and the application of almost every kind of chemical engineering process and plant, and is controlled by highly-skilled technical personnel, equipped with the latest scientific instruments for measuring, recording and controlling temperatures, pressures, concentration and flow of materials in the various stages of treatment.

Construction occupied nearly three years, and employed on the average one hundred men on the site.

Approximately one hundred men are engaged directly in manufacture and maintenance — the works operate continuously throughout the twenty-four hours.

Attached to the works is a camp for 50 men and provision is made for all meals and recreation facilities.

‘Tasmanian

The activities of Alstergren Pty. Ltd. and their associated companies, Tasmanian Plywood Mills Pty. Ltd. and Loongana Sawmill Pty. Ltd., are widespread, and very large quantities of all types of timbers and plywood are being produced. The company has been associated with the Tasmanian timber industry for 20 years, and through steady development, is now responsible for the direct employment of over 200 people in this district, as well as a further 300 persons in associated companies in other parts of the State. The sawmilling, logging and plywood manufacturing methods adopted are most modern, and fullest utilisation of our forests has been the result. Particular reference must be made about the activities of Tasmanian Plywood Mills Pty. Ltd., which, after five difficult years of perseverance with timbers that hitherto have been regarded as unsuitable for plywood manufacture, is now producing an excellent class of plywood in quantities comparable with the largest in the Commonwealth. Present production is at the rate of approximately 5,000,000 square feet annually, and this will    be increased shortly with the arrival    of    additional modern

equipment from overseas. The factory was established at Somerset in 1941 by Alstergren Pty. Ltd. and Gunnersen Nosworthy Pty Ltd and    has been    in operation continuously since    then. Supplies of

plywood from    other sources have dwindled    to    practically nothing,

and    now the    Somerset mills have proved    to    be a mote than

satisfactory substitute by providing for Tasmania a quantity of 25 per cent over that which she normally used before the war. The

oN?ewspaper:    “

For nearly sixty years "The Advocate” has regularly and faithfully chronicled the march of events for its readers.

Founded in 1890, its growth has reflected the progress and development of Burnie and the wider area it serves.

Originally a bi-weekly, publishing only local news, its expansion has kept pace with and frequently anticipated the demands of growing population and wider interests which modern means of travel and communication facilitated.

To-day, as one of the three daily newspapers in Tasmania, it presents through its connections with leading news sources, up-to-the-minute and complete cover of international, national. State and district news. It has marched in line with modern trends in

Plywoods

furniture and building industries are loud in their praises of the product, which actually enabled them to continue operating

This enterprising firm is ever-watchful for new and better means of timber production and processing. It has representatives in all States of Australia as well as United States, Canada, England and Norway, who relay latest developments of all phases of the industry. Recently they purchased two ships especially equipped for timber stowage, to relieve congestion at many of their timber yards, which were becoming saturated because of the lack of shipping space offering by the usual services. These vessels, incidentally, will back-load several hundred tons of general cargo weekly.

A policy of afforestation with pines and other suitable species is now being pursued actively in Victoria, and will shortly spread to Tasmania. Availability of experienced laboi has hampered progress in this respect in the past, but it is hoped that this will be overcome in the near future.

The company has in mind now a plan for the erection of homes for workers on land especially purchased for the purpose.

The timber and plywood industry is one of great importance to the State, and it is gratifying that Burnie is the main centre of activities of this enterprising firm.

The Advocate”

format and    presentation, and can    claim to    be among    the first

rank of provincial newspapers in Australia.

Thtcughout, "The Advocate" has maintained its role as the protagonist    of local interests; as    the mirror of contemporary

happenings in the communities which give it life.

With the maxim, "Fair and Impartial," it has striven to maintain the statement of policy set out in the first issue on October 1, 1890 : "Our news columns will be free to all classes of the community without partiality."

Associated with the newspaper enterprise of the proprietors, Harris and    Co. Pty. Ltd., is a    modern'    commercial    pxinting

department    which was responsible    for the    production    of this

brochure.

The Emu Bay Railway Company Limited is a private Railway Company whose Line runs between Burnie and Zeehan through some of the most attractive scenery of the Island, and each year an increasing number of tourists travel through the Line. The passenger service is run by Walker-Gardiner Rail Motor, which was specially designed for comfort and visibility; it is similar to the new rail cars ordered by the Victorian Government Railways recently, after viewing the Company’s car.

The heavy haulage of the Company consists principally of mineral production of the Electrolytic Zinc Company at Rosebery and the Tullah Ore Treatment Company at Tullah, which is brought to Burnie for export; together with a certain amount of timber traffic.

The Engineering Shops of The Emu Bay Railway Co. Ltd.

are large and able to cope with all classes of Foundry and Machine Work.

During the war a large quantity of machine tool parts were made, together with 5-ton, 60-ft. span crane construction of trolly wheels and axles for use in other factories; panel br.rlging; pontoons; anchor windlasses; winches; equipment for Tasmanian Wooden Shipbuilding Board, and casting of chill moulds for ammunition factories. All patterns for same were made and all castings produced by the Company at its Burnie shops.

The total cost of work done for the Defence Department amounted to £85,000, making a valuable contribution to Australia’s war effort.

The shops are constantly being improved with new machines and a steel foundry is to be opened shortly.

^Rich. Dairying Industry

The importance of dairying in the economy of mixed farming has received increased recognition and consequently the output of dairy products has rapidly expanded.

There are within 14 miles of Burnie three co-operative butter factories — the North-Western Dairy Co. Pty. Ltd.; Burnie; Table Cape Butter Factory, at Wynyard, and Yolla Dairy Co., at Yolla. The output of these is approximately 850 tons of butter annually.

Some 60 per cent, of the butter produced in the Burnie area is exported to the United Kingdom, mainly by overseas vessels which call at Burnie.

In addition to its Burnie factory, the N.W. Co-operative Dairy Co. Ltd. produces butter at Devonport and Deloraine, and operates a bacon factory at Somerset, near Burnie, at which an average of 10,000 pigs is processed annually. The company has for many years exported baconer and pork carcases to the United Kingdom.

During war years producers relied largely on crops which yielded quick returns. However, with land and a climate admirably suited to dairying and a high price for dairy products, the industry has claimed wider attention.

cPotato Rese.

The Potato Station conducted by the Department of Agriculture at Tewkesbury, 17 mites by road from Burnie, is of immense value to the potato industry. Total area is 803 acres, of which 250 acres are cultivated. The balance consists of rough grazing country and regrowth eucalypt forest. The property is leased from the Closer Settlement Department, and was a Soldier Settlement farm, of which the Department took occupation in 1933.

The property is hilly and broken by creeks and springs, and originally carried a heavy forest of myrtle (beech), cucalypts and blackwood. The soil is a fertile one of dolomite extraction. Texture is quite good and is typical of much of Tasmania’s potato country.

The average annual rainfall is approximately 63 inches (the highest recorded being 73 inches). The greater portion falls in the period May-November, but usually growth-promoting rains can be expected in other months. The main cultivation work is carried out around the 1700 feet level, though the highest point on the farm is 1,874 feet above sea level. Snow occurs several times each winter, and individual falls of 15 inches have been recorded. The lowest recorded temperature was 10 degrees Fahrenheit.

Potato production is mainly confined to the two principal export varieties—Brownell (mid and late season strains) and Bismarck — a first early. Two other varieties, Up-To-Date and Pink Eye, are also grown for use as nuclear stock in seed certification. Small quantities of Sebago, Carmen and Bressees’ Prolific are produced and sold to specialist growers who, however, do not participate in the Potato Certification Scheme.

The average annual planting at the Station is around 37 acres per year, of which Brownell occupies two-thirds. The heaviest recorded production was 5,450 sacks, each containing 150 lb., or a total yield of about 363 tons. The average production is in the vicinity of 4,000 sacks each year.

The objectives of the Potato Seed Certification Scheme are to secure, by the use of healthy seed, an increase in the yield of

arch Station

crops planted to meet the export demand for ware potatoes. The high incidence of virus infection in seed stocks prior to certification had so reduced yields that one year the State return per acre fell as low as 1.94 tons. The present State average yield is now almost 4 tons per acre, and under good conditions yields up to twelve tons are fairly common. This increase in production is almost entirely due to healthier seed potatoes whose identity is safeguarded by certification. It is now difficult to find stocks of standard varieties that have not originated at Tewkesbury, and thus the general average health of all potatoes in the State has been raised.

The Potato Certification Scheme aims at retaining the identity of Elite seed distributed from Tewkesbury Potato Station, which seed is placed with what are called Mother Seed growers, whose farms must have sufficient isolation of the potato seed area and which must be at an elevation of not less than 1,000 feet. During the growth of the crop it is inspected by Departmental Officers who supervise and advise in regard to "rogueing.” This "rogueing” consists of removing diseased plants.

Mother Seed growers can sell only to farms who agree to reserve the whole of their crops grown from such Mother Seed for sale as Certified Seed. These crops are again grown at an altitude of not less than 800 feet, and are "rogued” in a manner similar to the Mother Seed. This Certified Seed is made available to growers of potatoes for commercial production.

It    will    thus be seen that Elite seed    is    produced at

Tewkesbury    Potato Station. This is bulked up    by    hign altitude

growers, such seed being known as Mother Seed. This Mother Seed is planted to produce Certified Seed, which to-day is commercially used by those engaged in commercial- production for market.

Amongst other work carried out at the Station is the testing, from the agronomic aspect, of hybrids produced by C.S.I.R. The objects    are    the breeding of strains resistant    to,    or tolerant of

the viruses,    and    also the possibility of resistance    to    Irish Blight is

being studied. In this work State Agronomists have been closely associated with Dr. J. G. Bald, now associate Professor of Plant Pathology, Berkeley, University of California, particularly in his FX investigational work.

‘Tasmanian

The activities of Alstergren Pty. Ltd. and their associated companies, Tasmanian Plywood Mills Pty. Ltd. and Loongana Sawmill Pty. Ltd., are widespread, and very large quantities of all types of timbers and plywood are being produced. The company has been associated with the Tasmanian timber industry for 20 years, and through steady development is now responsible for the direct employment of over 200 people in this district, as well as a further 300 persons in associated companies in other parts of the State. The sawmilling, logging and plywood manufacturing methods adopted are most modern, and fullest utilisation of our forests has been the result. Particular reference must be made about the activities of Tasmanian Plywood Mills Pty. Ltd., which, after five difficult years of perseverance with timbers that hitherto have been regarded as unsuitable for plywood manufacture, is now producing an excellent class of plywood in quantities comparable with the largest in the Commonwealth. Present production is at the rate of approximately 5,000,000 square feet annually, and this will    be increased shortly with the arrival    of    additional modern

equipment from overseas. The factory was established at Somerset in 1941 by Alstergren Pty. Ltd. and Gunnersen Nosworthy Pty Ltd., and    has been    in operation continuously since    then. Supplies of

plywood from    other sources have dwindled    to    practically nothing,

and    now the    Somerset mills have proved    to    be a more than

satisfactory substitute by providing for Tasmania a quantity of 25 per cent over that which she normally used before the war. The

CNewspaper:    “

For nearly sixty years ‘’The Advocate” has regularly and faithfully chronicled the march of events for its readers.

Founded in 1890, its growth has reflected the progress and development of Burnie and the wider area it serves,

Originally a bi-weekly, publishing only local news, its expansion has kept pace with and frequently anticipated the demands of growing population and wider interests which modern means of travel and communication facilitated.

To-day, as one of the three daily newspapers in Tasmania, it presents through its connections with leading news sources, up-to-the-minute and complete cover of international, national. State and district news. It has marched in line with modern trends in

Plywoods

furniture and building industries are loud in their praises of the product, which actually enabled them to continue operating

This enterprising firm is ever-watchful for new and better means of timber production and processing. It has representatives in all States of Australia as well as United States, Canada, England and Norway, who relay latest developments of all phases of the industry. Recently they purchased two ships especially equipped for timber stowage, to relieve congestion at many of their timber yards, which were becoming saturated because of the lack of shipping space offering by the usual services. These vessels, incidentally, will back-load several hundred tons of general cargo weekly.

A policy of afforestation with pines and other suitable species is now being pursued actively in Victoria, and will shortly spread to Tasmania. Availability of experienced laboi has hampered progress in this respect in the past, but it is hoped that this will be overcome in the near future.

The company has in mind now a plan for the erection of homes for workers on land especially purchased for the purpose.

The timber and plywood industry is one of great importance to the State, and it is gratifying that Burnie is the main centre of activities of this enterprising firm.

The Advocate”

format and    presentation, and can    claim to    be among    the first

rank of provincial newspapers in Australia.

Thtcughout, "The Advocate” has maintained its role as the protagonist    of local interests; as    the mirror of contemporary

happenings in the communities which give it life.

With the maxim, "Fair and Impartial,” it has striven to maintain the statement of policy set out in the first issue on October 1, 1890 : "Our news columns will be free to all classes of the community without partiality.”

Associated with the newspaper enterprise of the proprietors, Harris and    Co. Pty. Ltd., is a    modern    commercial    piinting

department    which was responsible    for the    production    of this

brochure.

Member


Representative


Member


Representative


E. A. Lees    E.    A. Lees

'Phone 691

Mace & Wardlaw    R.    Wardlaw

Accountants. Valuators. Land.

Commission and Estate Agents 17 Wilson Street

Modern Motors    A.    Newman

Garage and Service Station Mount Street, Burnle 'Phone 300

A. Mainsbridge    A.    Mainsbrldge

Home Furnisher 61 Wilson Street 'Phone 461

North-Western Co-operative Freezing    A. C. Poulton

and Canning Co.

Somerset

Phone Burnle 161

T. O'Toole    T. O'Toole

Complete Home Furnisher Cattley Street, Burnle 'Phone 302. (Three Oh Two)

Alex. Osborne Pty. Ltd    A. Osborne

General Hardware Merchants

Electrical Appliances. Radio, Motor

Cycles. Cycles, Sporting Goods

Universal Corner, Burnle

'Phone 130

Maples    L. F. Cooney

Home Furnishers

Cr. Wilson and Wllmot Streets

'Phone 468

J. Overall Pty. Ltd.    A. Overall

Darwin Nursery Sulphur Creek 'Phone 231

Marine Board of Burnie

J. S. Munro Pty. Ltd.

Merchants

80 Marine Terrace, Burnle Telephone 550

Motors Pty. Ltd.

Garage Proprietors and Automotive Service Distributors for General Motors Holden Cars and Trucks Frlgidaire Distributors Phone 106

F. Nothrop

Direct Fruit Supply 69 Wilson Street Telephone 286

North-Western Co-op. Dairy Co. Butter. Bacon and Smallgoods Manufacturers Marine Terrace Telephone 72 (two lines)

Nor-West Cleaners

12 Mount Street, Burnle

Alf. Noble

District Representative A.M.P.


H. Miller (Secretary)

J. H. S. Munro Managing Director

J. C. Nicol


F. Nothrop

Ltd.    R. F. Johnson

J. W. Anderson M. Crawford

A. Noble


H. O. Philpott    H. O. Philpott

Painter and House Decorator 24 Queen Street, Burnie Phone 471

G. B. O’Shannessey    G. B. O’Shannessey

44 Bass Highway, Cooee Phone Burnie 601

Reg. A. Plummer    r. a. Plummer

Merchant

Burnle

Telephone 258

Rex & Son Pty. Ltd.    w. J. T. Davis

Ship Chandlers and General Merchants 26 Mount Street 'Phone 594

Replacement Parts (Tas.) Pty. Ltd.    T. J. McMahon

Wholesale Motor Parts 42-44 Mount Street, Burnle Phone 219

V. F. Spurr    v. F. Spurr

Wireless Service and Electrical Goods 19 Wllmot Street 'Phone 46

F. H. Stephens Pty. Ltd.    K. V. Hodge

Transport and Customs Agents 91 Wilson Street Telephone 335

Member

Representative

Member

Representative

S. G. Stebbins, M.C., FR.H.S.

Treweek’s Newsagency

Books, Stationery, Fancy Goods Wilson Street, Burnie Phone 91

H.

J. Treweek

S. W Smith G. Sorell

The English, Scottish & Australian Bank Ltd.

Cr. Wilson and Cattley Streets ’Phone 78

R.

Wilkins

C. W. Stratton

The A. H, Pease Shoe Store

3G Wilson Street 'Phone 89

A.

H. Pease

C. J. Summers

The Bank of New South Wales

69 Wilson Street 'Phone 351

A

MacDermott

Table Cape Butter Factory

Wynyard 'Phone 11

J.

S. Game

T. F. Stonehouse

The Tattersalls

W.

H. Tattersall

Builders and Joiners Wilmot Street. Burnie 'Phone 174

H.

W. Tattersall

L. Broadfleld

Tasmanian Farmers’ Co-operative Association Ltd.

General Merchants Wilson Street. Burnie 'Phone 19.

K.

G. Coleman

J. C. Leary

The Union Bank of Australia Ltd.

53 Cattley Street, Burnie

F.

E. Ford

R. J. Wragg

’Phone (res.) J42

Union Steamship Coy. of N.Z. Ltd. 9 Marine Terrace, Burnie 'Phones 9 and 114 Head Office, Wellington, N.Z.

W.

O. Fry

J. H. Correll. Manager

Van Diemen’s Land Co.

Pastoralists

Marine Terrace, Burnie

A.

B. Morrison

W. Senior

Winter’s Studio

E.

A. Winter

A, W. Tattersall, M.L.C. K. A. Tattersall

G. T. Wright

Farmer and Merchant Burnie

G.

T. Wright

H. J. Tanner

C. R. Williams & Sons

Bakers and Pastrycooks

C.

R. Williams

11 Mount Street Phone 204


Stebbins’ Nurseries

Daffodil Specialists Burnie

Smith & Dunn Pty. Ltd.

Vauxhall, Bedford Distributors Burnie

G. Sorell

Avon Street, Parklands

C. W. Stratton

Mercer and Clothier 67 Wilson Street, Burnie ’Phone 115

Summers and Jacobs

General Butchers 35 Wilson Street. Burnie Phone 80

T. F. Stonehouse

Newsagent

17 Cattlcy Street, Burnie Booking office Sullivan's Service Cars. A.N.A. and Circular Head Motor Service Phone 184

The River Don Trading Co. Pty. Ltd.

General Merchants 44-46 Wilson Street Telephone 23

The Farmers’ Co-operative Auctioneers Ltd.

Wilson Street. Burnie

Tasmanian Woolgrowers’ Agency Co- Ltd.

Auctioneers, etc.

Marine Terrace, Burnie 'Phone 294

The Commercial Bank of Australia ltd.

Cattley Street. Burnie ’Phone 134

The Bank of Australasia

Burnie

A. W. Tattersall & Son

Hardware Merchants and Builders’ Ironmongers Wilson Street

Tanner’s Shoe Store

Wilson Street ’Phone 284

Member

Representative

Member

Representative

Wynyard Sawmilling Co.

A. G. Blackwell

A. O. Williams

A.

O. Williams

Wynyard

C. A. Blackwell

Authorised Surveyor

Jorgensen Street, Montello (Burnie)

R. H. Wilson

R. H. Wilson

Farmer

M. A. Whitford

M

A. Whitford

Ridgley

General Storekeeper

Stowport

L. F. Wells

L. F. Wells

Hardware and Plumbers’ Merchant

Burnie Tyre Service

Sheet Metal Worker

Cappers and Vulcanlzers

16 Mount Street, Burnie

Cr. Mount and Wllmot Streets, Burnie

Phone 260

Phone 397

A.

Domeney

^ This brochure was printed at Burnie by * The Advocate” on supercalendered printing manufactured at Burnie by Associated Pulp and Paper Mills Limited.

(Radio Station 7 BU

Burnie was granted one of the early licences for broadcasting stations in Tasmania, and has in its local commercial station 7BU a fine asset.

Town and station have grown together;    the latter

assisting in no small way, not only with Burnie’s development, but in a wider sphere, with the progress of the whole of the North-West Coast, particularly with its assistance to the farmer, whose products contribute so largely to the wealth of the district.

Since its inception 7BU has had as its General Manager a tireless worker for charity and the man on the land in A. D. Towner, Esq., M.B.E., who has been recently decorated for his work in these fields.

The programmes of 7BU eminate from studios in Wilson Street, and are broadcast from a modern transmitter, which was in fact itself completely designed and constructed in the station’s workshops in Burnie, under the direction of Mr. Tas. Lord, A.M.I.R.E., Assistant Manager and Chief Engineer, who has been associated with 7BU since the station’s inception.

Each morning, Monday to Saturday, transmission commences at 6.30, and continues throughout most of the day until close down at 10.30 p.m.


Almost all important National advertisers make very full use of the commercial possibilities offered by this modern sales medium; while many local advertisers pay personal tribute to the assistance rendered by 7BU in building up their businesses.

Special attention is given to sports activities from the station, while one of the most-Iistened-to sessions is the 10 to 11 programme on Sunday mornings, in which a host of cheerios are regularly sent to and from sick folk in hospitals spread throughout the State and Victoria.

The Sunpolishers’ Club, as the Station’s Children's Club is known, boasts a membership of 12,100 children, all of whom are pledged to ’’Brighten the Lives of Others.” In fact, it might be truly said that this is the aim and policy of the station, and its staff of 10.

Free time is provided for the churches. Particularly during the war period, 7BU took a leading part in the raising of local loan quotas.

In short, it was established to give service — and wherever and whenever it can lend a helping hand the Burnie Station 7BU is on the job.


West Parle Oval

It is on this fine sporting ground that the Burnie Athletic Club conducts its big carnival annually on New Years Day. Because of the liberal prize money paid the Burnie Carnival is known throughout Australia. The Burnie Gift is worth £250 and the Burnie Wheel Race £250.

Since 1913 the Club has missed conducting only three carnivals (on account of the war). A couple of modified programmes were conducted.


The importance of the carnival may be gauged from the following achievements since 1913:—

Gate receipts, approximately £30,000; share of profits paid to the Burnie Council for ground improvements, approximately £10,000; spent on ground improvements, £1,333; patriotic funds, £1,257; paid in prize money—cycling, £6,000; pedestrian, £6,000; bands, £4,000; other prize money, £2,000.


CAustvalian Titan

Situated amid pleasant bush scenery and fronting Bass Highway four miles from Burnie is the modern works of Australian Titan Products Pty. Ltd., where are manufactured titanium dioxide pigments for use in the paint, lacquer, enamel, paper, plastics, linoleum, porcelain and many other industries.

Australian Titan Products Pty. Ltd. is a subsidiary of British Titan Products Co. Ltd., of England, who own and operate two large plants at Billingham and Grimsby engaged in the manufacture of a complete range of Titanium pigments distributed throughout the British Empire.

The Burnie works, the first unit of which was completed in November, 1948, will, when finally completed, have a capacity in excess of the present total requirements for Titanium pigments ot the Commonwealth.

The buildings and plant were erected to plans and specifications supplied by the parent company suitably modified to meet local conditions, and are the most modern in the industry.

The buildings are laid out on a rectangular plan with concrete roads, and comprise the following blocks: office and canteen, workshops and store, laboratories, boiler station with pump house and electricity sub-station, process building where manufacture takes place.

The offices, canteen and workers’ change and ablution block are surrounded by extensive lawns and flower beds.

A private siding is connected to the main N.W. Coast line, enabling ore, acid, fuel oil, coal and stores to be discharged directly to storage tanks or bunkers as received from the Port of Burnie or Hobart, or local coal mines.

Raw water is supplied from a reservoir (constructed by the Company) at Chasm Creek, and is piped one and a quarter

Products Pty. Ltd.

miles to the site where it is purified in a modern plant to render it suitable for works purposes and drinking.

Electric power is taken from the H.E.C. at 22,000 volts and transformed on the site to working voltages for the 180 motors varying from 1 h.p. to 140 h.p.

Titanium pigments are obtained by the solution of the black mineral Ilmenite, an oxide of iron and titanium, in sulphuric acid following extensive treatment of the solutions to remove impurities and to precipitate the titanium oxide in suitable form. This precipitate is washed to remove impurities, treated with a variety of chemical agents, heated to nearly 1,000 degrees centigrade to confer on it the pigmentary properties, after which it is ground to an exceedingly fine powder.

Titanium dioxide is intensely white, the strongest of all white pigments.

The method of manufacture involves very many stages, and the application of almost every kind of chemical engineering process and plant, and is controlled by highly-skilled technical personnel, equipped with the latest scientific instruments for measuring, recording and controlling temperatures, pressures, concentration and flow of materials in the various stages of treatment.

Construction occupied nearly three years, and employed on the average one hundred men on the site.

Approximately one hundred men are engaged directly in manufacture and maintenance — the works operate continuously throughout the twenty-four hours.

Attached to the works is a camp for 50 men and provision is made for all meals and recreation facilities.



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