What do we know about preventing drug-related harm through social developmental intervention with children and young people

Toumbourou, John, Williams, Joanne, Patton, George and Waters, Elizabeth 2005, What do we know about preventing drug-related harm through social developmental intervention with children and young people, in Preventing harmful substance use: the evidence base for policy and practice., John Wiley & Sons Ltd., Chichester, England, pp.87-100.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title What do we know about preventing drug-related harm through social developmental intervention with children and young people
Author(s) Toumbourou, John
Williams, Joanne
Patton, George
Waters, Elizabeth
Title of book Preventing harmful substance use: the evidence base for policy and practice.
Editor(s) Stockwell, Tim
Publication date 2005
Chapter number 3:2
Total chapters 37
Start page 87
End page 100
Total pages 14
Publisher John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Place of Publication Chichester, England
Summary This chapter examines the evidence for the effectiveness of interventions aiming to reduce drug-related harm by improving conditions for healthy develeopment in the earliest years through adolescence. Of the interventions beginning prior to birth, there is efficacy evidence that family home visitation is a feasible strategy for implementation with disadvataged families and can reduce risk factors for early developmental deficits and thereby improve childhood development outcomes. There is efficacy evidence for strategies such as parent education and school preparation through the pre-school age period. Some of the strongest evidence for efficacy in reducing developmental pathways to drug-related harm comes from interventions delivered through the early school years to improve educational environments. Of the interventions targeting the high school age period, school drug education has been the most commonly evaluated. The evidence suggests that short term reduction in both drug use and progression to frequent drug use may be achievable through this strategy, but the prospects for longer-term and population-level behaviour change is still unclear. In overview, a range of prevention strategies have been developed and evaluated. Most of the exisiting evidence is restricted to efficacy studies and there are future challenges to progress evaluation through to studies of effectiveness. In general, prevention programmes appear more successful where they maintain intervention activities over a number of years and incorporate more than one strategy. Much of the existing research has been based in North America and evaluates discrete programmes. Future research should test effects in other countries, in different social contexts and seek to better understand the interrelated effects of combining interventions within the community. Developmental prevention programmes target different age periods and social settings, hence communities have the challenge of coordinating a mixture of programmes that address the local conditions that adversely influence child and youth development. There are opportunities in this work to coordinate prevention activities using funding from different jurisdictions (e.g., crime prevention, health promotion, mental health, education, substance abuse prevention).
ISBN 0470092289
9780470092286
Language eng
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
HERDC Research category B1.1 Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2005, John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30000985

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: School of Psychology
School of Health and Social Development
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 426 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 03 Jul 2008, 11:16:39 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.