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Race as political strategy by US presidential candidates: a case study

Weerakkody, Niranjala 2001, Race as political strategy by US presidential candidates: a case study, Ecquid Novi: African journalism studies, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 76-95.

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Title Race as political strategy by US presidential candidates: a case study
Author(s) Weerakkody, Niranjala
Journal name Ecquid Novi: African journalism studies
Volume number 22
Issue number 1
Start page 76
End page 95
Publisher University of Wisconsin Press, Journal Division
Place of publication Madison, Wis.
Publication date 2001
ISSN 0256-0054
1942-0773
Keyword(s) boomerang effect
electoral
framing
media messages
political strategy
presidential elections
public opinion
social constructionism
race
spiral of silence
United States of America
Summary Race has played an important part in US presidential politics in contemporary history. Different political parties and candidates have followed covert strategies playing on the prejudices of white voters both cognitively and emotionally by linking racerelated issues to the majority's individual and group interests. This elite discourse carried to the public by the mainstream media, along with media's practices of stereotyping, priming, framing and agenda setting, help to justify racial prejudice, discrimination against minorities and their marginalized status, while maintaining the status quo. Taking the social constructionist position, this case study examines the opinions expressed by a sample of undecided voters selected from different geographic locations at various stages of the 1992 US presidential campaign under the themes 'Candidates' racial prejudice' and 'Race is used as political strategy by candidates.'
Language eng
Field of Research 190399 Journalism and Professional Writing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30001074

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Literary and Communication Studies
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