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Similarities in body image in sisters: the role of sociocultural internalization and social comparison

Tsiantas, Georgia and King, Ross Mcivor 2001, Similarities in body image in sisters: the role of sociocultural internalization and social comparison, Eating disorders: the journal of treatment and prevention, vol. 9, no. 2, Summer, pp. 141-158, doi: 10.1080/10640260127717.

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Title Similarities in body image in sisters: the role of sociocultural internalization and social comparison
Author(s) Tsiantas, Georgia
King, Ross McivorORCID iD for King, Ross Mcivor orcid.org/0000-0002-0819-7077
Journal name Eating disorders: the journal of treatment and prevention
Volume number 9
Issue number 2
Season Summer
Start page 141
End page 158
Publisher Brunner-Routledge
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2001
ISSN 1064-0266
1532-530X
Summary The sociocultural theory of body image disturbance states that Western women experience pressure from sources such as parents, peers, and the media to maintain thinness. Social comparison theory emphasises the role of comparing one's appearance to others. Body image disturbance; awareness and Internalization of sociocultural messages regarding thinness; and sibling social comparisons were examined in 41 closest-in-age sisters through self-report questionnaires. Sisters showed similar levels of body image disturbance and sociocultural awareness and internalization. Sibling comparisons were negative for younger sisters but neutral or positive for older sisters. Sociocultural internalization predicted body dissatisfaction in both sisters, and body size distortion in younger sisters. Negative sibling comparisons during teenage years predicted body size distortion and body dissatisfaction in younger sisters, and preference for thinness in older sisters.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/10640260127717
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, Brunner-Routledge
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30001241

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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