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Ethically defensible decision-making in health care: challenges to traditional practice

Bailey, Susan 2001, Ethically defensible decision-making in health care: challenges to traditional practice, Australian health review, vol. 24, no. 4, pp. 27-31.

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Title Ethically defensible decision-making in health care: challenges to traditional practice
Author(s) Bailey, Susan
Journal name Australian health review
Volume number 24
Issue number 4
Start page 27
End page 31
Publisher Australian Healthcare Association
Place of publication Turner, A.C.T.
Publication date 2001
ISSN 0156-5788
1449-8944
Summary The concept of paternalism is deeply entrenched in health care. Decision-making about health care can be extremely difficult at times, and many competing interests may influence the outcomes. However, ethically defensible practice aligns itself with acknowledging the patient's prima facie right to be treated as an autonomous individual. This includes the patient's right to make informed decisions or to decide that other(s), such as the close family, should make decisions on his or her behalf. (author abstract)
Language eng
Field of Research 220106 Medical Ethics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, Australian Health Review
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30001294

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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