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Cadmium, copper, mercury, and zinc concentrations in tissues of the King Crab (Pseudocarcinus gigas) from southeast Australian waters

Turoczy, Nicholas J., Mitchell, Bradley, Levings, Andrew H. and Rajendran, Vijaya S. 2001, Cadmium, copper, mercury, and zinc concentrations in tissues of the King Crab (Pseudocarcinus gigas) from southeast Australian waters, Environment international, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 327-334, doi: 10.1016/S0160-4120(01)00064-2.

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Title Cadmium, copper, mercury, and zinc concentrations in tissues of the King Crab (Pseudocarcinus gigas) from southeast Australian waters
Author(s) Turoczy, Nicholas J.
Mitchell, Bradley
Levings, Andrew H.
Rajendran, Vijaya S.
Journal name Environment international
Volume number 27
Issue number 4
Start page 327
End page 334
Publisher Elsevier Science
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2001-10
ISSN 0160-4120
1873-6750
Keyword(s) King crab
Giant crab
metals
food safety
Summary The concentrations of cadmium, copper, mercury, and zinc were determined in muscle (body, claw, and leg), hepatopancreas, and gill tissues of Pseudocarcinus gigas, an exceptionally large, long-lived, and deep-dwelling crab species. The accumulation patterns observed are discussed in terms of both intra- and interspecies variations, with particular attention to the possible consequences of the extreme size and depth range of P. gigas. Metal concentrations did not depend significantly on sex of the crab. Significant differences between tissues were detected for all metals, and the distribution of metal between the tissues was different for each metal. Significant correlations were found between metal concentrations in the various tissues and crab size, and these are discussed and rationalised. The concentrations of mercury and zinc in muscle tissue increased with crab size and were high compared to other crab species. The concentrations of cadmium and copper present in edible tissues were not especially high compared to other crab species, but the concentration of cadmium in the hepatopancreas is of dietary concern.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/S0160-4120(01)00064-2
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2001, Elsevier Science Ltd.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30001315

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Ecology and Environment
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