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Which aspects of socioeconomic status are related to obesity among men and women?

Ball, Kylie, Mishra, Gita and Crawford, David 2002, Which aspects of socioeconomic status are related to obesity among men and women?, International journal of obesity, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 559-565.

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Title Which aspects of socioeconomic status are related to obesity among men and women?
Author(s) Ball, Kylie
Mishra, Gita
Crawford, David
Journal name International journal of obesity
Volume number 26
Issue number 4
Start page 559
End page 565
Publisher Nature Pub.
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2002
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Keyword(s) socioeconomic status
body mass index
national nutrition survey
Summary OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the relationships between body weight and fat distribution, and four empirically derived domains of socioeconomic status: employment, housing, migration status and family unit.

DESIGN: A population-based study was used.

PARTICIPANTS: A total of 8667 randomly-selected adults (4167 men; 4500 women) who participated in the 1995 Australian National Health and Nutrition Surveys provided data on a range of health factors including objective height, weight and body fat distribution, and a range of sociodemographic indicators.

RESULTS: Results demonstrated associations for women, after controlling for age, between the employment domain, and body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio. Low status employed women were 1.4 times as likely to be overweight as high status employed women. There were less consistent relationships observed among these factors for men. Relationships between family unit and indicators of body weight and body fat distribution were observed for both men and women, with those who were married, particularly men (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.4-2.0), at higher risk of overweight. The migration and housing socioeconomic status domains were not consistently associated with body mass index or waist-to-hip ratio.

CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that different components of socioeconomic status may be important in predicting obesity, and thus should be examined separately. Future research would benefit from investigating the underlying mechanisms governing the relationships between socioeconomic status domains further, particularly those related to employment and family unit and obesity

Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30001515

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.