The role of personality in leadership: an application of the five-factor model in the Australian military

McCormack, Luke and Mellor, David 2002, The role of personality in leadership: an application of the five-factor model in the Australian military, Military psychology, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 179-197.

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Title The role of personality in leadership: an application of the five-factor model in the Australian military
Author(s) McCormack, Luke
Mellor, David
Journal name Military psychology
Volume number 14
Issue number 3
Start page 179
End page 197
Publisher Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc
Place of publication Hillsdale, N.J.
Publication date 2002-07
ISSN 0899-5605
Summary This study investigated the relation between the five-factor model (FFM) of personality trait domains and leadership effectiveness. Ninety-nine Australian Army commissioned officers completed the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO-PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992) and were rated by their superior officer on the Australian Army annual leadership effectiveness evaluation schedule. Participants indicated whether they had been selected to attend a leadership promotion course at the Army Command and Staff College, widely regarded within the Army as indicative of an officer's effectiveness. It was hypothesized that leadership effectiveness would be predicted by the personality trait domains of high Conscientiousness, Openness, Agreeableness, and Extraversion and by low Neuroticism. High Conscientiousness and low Extraversion scores predicted high leadership effectiveness and the likelihood of attending the leadership promotion course. High Openness scores also predicted the likelihood of attending the promotion course. The results support the utility of the FFM in exploring the role of personality in leadership effectiveness among military leaders.
Notes Online Publication Date: 01 July 2002
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2002, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30001526

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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