`Zealotry or nostalgic regret`? women leaders in technical and further education in Australia : agents of change, entrepreneurial educators or corporate citizens?

Blackmore, Jill and Sachs, Judyth 2003, `Zealotry or nostalgic regret`? women leaders in technical and further education in Australia : agents of change, entrepreneurial educators or corporate citizens?, Gender, work & organization, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 478-503.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title `Zealotry or nostalgic regret`? women leaders in technical and further education in Australia : agents of change, entrepreneurial educators or corporate citizens?
Author(s) Blackmore, Jill
Sachs, Judyth
Journal name Gender, work & organization
Volume number 10
Issue number 4
Start page 478
End page 503
Publisher Blackwell
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2003
ISSN 0968-6673
1468-0432
Keyword(s) managerialism
marketization
technical and further education
change management
gender relations of organizations
leadership
Summary Education has been restructured in many Western post-industrial nation states during the 1990s. The Australian Technical and Further Education sector (TAFE) has been particularly susceptible to discourses of responsiveness to the market and the new entrepreneuralism. This article explores how women have been repositioned in contradictory and ambiguous ways as the new entrepreneurial middle managers by existing and emergent discourses that circulated in and through TAFE organizations. In turn, it points to how discourses of change management and client responsiveness took on particular readings within specific institutional and professional cultures of the eight Technical and Further Education institutions (TAFEs). At the same time, the restructuring that arose from the corporatization of TAFE, in a highly gendered process, through the twin strategies of marketization and the new managerialism produced new possibilities for individual women educators who moved up into middle management. Yet these individual women were positioned within highly masculinist 'neo-corporate bureaucratic cultures' that co-opted their passion for the capacity of education to make a difference and incorporated these new entrepeneurial work identities.
Language eng
Field of Research 130304 Educational Administration, Management and Leadership
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30001868

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Social and Cultural Studies in Education
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 442 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 08:08:58 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.