Phytophthora cinnamomi in native vegetation communities of southern Victoia - morphological variation and paragyny among isolates

Daniel, Rosalie, Wilson, Barbara and Cahill, David 2003, Phytophthora cinnamomi in native vegetation communities of southern Victoia - morphological variation and paragyny among isolates, Australasian plant pathology, vol. 32, no. 3, pp. 403-409.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Phytophthora cinnamomi in native vegetation communities of southern Victoia - morphological variation and paragyny among isolates
Formatted title Phytophthora cinnamomi in native vegetation communities of southern Victoia - morphological variation and paragyny among isolates
Author(s) Daniel, Rosalie
Wilson, Barbara
Cahill, David
Journal name Australasian plant pathology
Volume number 32
Issue number 3
Start page 403
End page 409
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic.
Publication date 2003
ISSN 0815-3191
1448-6032
Keyword(s) amphigynous
variability
phenotype
paragynous
morphology
dieback
Summary Morphology has often been used as an indicator of variability within species. The present study investigated morphological and physiological characteristics of isolates of Phytophthora cinnamomi collected from diseased vegetation communities at Anglesea, Victoria, and isolates collected from other regions in the State. Characteristics studied included growth rate on potato-dextrose agar (PDA), corn-meal agar and V8-juice agar at 24°C, growth rate on V8 agar at 15°C, colony morphology on PDA, sporangial and gametangial morphology, sporangial production and mating type. Phenotypic variation was demonstrated in radial growth rate, colony morphology and sporangial dimensions. Sporangial and oogonial dimensions and sporangial production were not significantly different between isolates from different geographical regions. All isolates were found to be of the A2 mating type suggesting variation was derived asexually. Paragynal associations, in an organism characteristically defined as amphigynal, were observed following crossing with A1 isolates. This is the first such study undertaken in southern Victoria. The findings highlight the importance of appropriate management of an area of such high conservation value as the Anglesea Heath to contain the current infection and to prevent introduction of new isolates into the area.
Language eng
Field of Research 060704 Plant Pathology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Australasian Plant Pathology Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30001990

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 433 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 08:12:15 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.