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Two dictyostelium orthologs of the prokaryotic cell division protein ftsZ localize to mitochondria and are required for the maintenance of normal mitochondrial morphology

Gilson, Peter, Yu, Xuan-Chuan, Hereld, Dale, Barth, Christian, Savage, Amelia, Kiefel, Ben, Lay, Sui, Fisher, Paul, Margolin, William and Beech, Peter 2003, Two dictyostelium orthologs of the prokaryotic cell division protein ftsZ localize to mitochondria and are required for the maintenance of normal mitochondrial morphology, Eukaryotic cell, vol. 2, no. 6, pp. 1315-1326, doi: 10.1128/EC.2.6.1315-1326.2003.

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Title Two dictyostelium orthologs of the prokaryotic cell division protein ftsZ localize to mitochondria and are required for the maintenance of normal mitochondrial morphology
Author(s) Gilson, Peter
Yu, Xuan-Chuan
Hereld, Dale
Barth, Christian
Savage, Amelia
Kiefel, Ben
Lay, Sui
Fisher, Paul
Margolin, William
Beech, Peter
Journal name Eukaryotic cell
Volume number 2
Issue number 6
Start page 1315
End page 1326
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Place of publication Washington D.C., Wash.
Publication date 2003-12
ISSN 1535-9778
1535-9786
Keyword(s) Dictyostelium Orthologs
Summary In bacteria, the protein FtsZ is the principal component of a ring that constricts the cell at division. Though all mitochondria probably arose through a single, ancient bacterial endosymbiosis, the mitochondria of only certain protists appear to have retained FtsZ, and the protein is absent from the mitochondria of fungi, animals, and higher plants. We have investigated the role that FtsZ plays in mitochondrial division in the genetically tractable protist Dictyostelium discoideum, which has two nuclearly encoded FtsZs, FszA and FszB, that are targeted to the inside of mitochondria. In most wild-type amoebae, the mitochondria are spherical or rod-shaped, but in fsz-null mutants they become elongated into tubules, indicating that a decrease in mitochondrial division has occurred. In support of this role in organelle division, antibodies to FszA and FszA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) show belts and puncta at multiple places along the mitochondria, which may define future or recent sites of division. FszB-GFP, in contrast, locates to an electron-dense, submitochondrial body usually located at one end of the organelle, but how it functions during division is unclear. This is the first demonstration of two differentially localized FtsZs within the one organelle, and it points to a divergence in the roles of these two proteins.
Language eng
DOI 10.1128/EC.2.6.1315-1326.2003
Field of Research 060103 Cell Development, Proliferation and Death
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, American Society for Microbiology
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30001996

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Biological and Chemical Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.