You are not logged in.

Floristic and structural characteristics of a coastal heathland exhibiting symptoms of Phytophthora cinnamomi infestation in the eastern Otway Ranges, Victoria

Laidlaw, Scott and Wilson, Barbara 2003, Floristic and structural characteristics of a coastal heathland exhibiting symptoms of Phytophthora cinnamomi infestation in the eastern Otway Ranges, Victoria, Australian journal of botany, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 283-293, doi: 10.1071/BT02100.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Floristic and structural characteristics of a coastal heathland exhibiting symptoms of Phytophthora cinnamomi infestation in the eastern Otway Ranges, Victoria
Formatted title Floristic and structural characteristics of a coastal heathland exhibiting symptoms of Phytophthora cinnamomi infestation in the eastern Otway Ranges, Victoria
Author(s) Laidlaw, Scott
Wilson, Barbara
Journal name Australian journal of botany
Volume number 51
Issue number 3
Start page 283
End page 293
Publisher Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2003
ISSN 0067-1924
1444-9862
Summary The floristics and structure of heathland vegetation exhibiting symptoms of Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands infestation was assessed at two sites in heathlands at Anglesea, Victoria. There were significant effects in both floristics and structure. Thirteen heathland species were significantly less abundant in diseased areas and 23 species were more abundant. Diseased (infested) vegetation, when compared with non-diseased areas, had less cover of Xanthorrhoea australis and shrub species and a greater cover of sedges, grasses and open ground. Structural differences were observed between heights 0 and 0.6 m, with a decline in cover recorded in diseased vegetation. Non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination of the floristic data showed a clear separation of diseased and non-diseased vegetation and that changes in floristic composition post-infestation were similar at both sites. Although there was some evidence of regeneration of X. australis, the recovery capacity of other susceptible species at Anglesea is unknown. The long-term consequences of loss of species and structure in the eastern Otways mean that the vegetation is unlikely to return to former status, especially if the pathogen continues to reinfect.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/BT02100
Field of Research 050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, CSIRO
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002131

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Ecology and Environment
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 606 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 08:16:11 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.