Openly accessible

The relationship between education and food consumption in the 1995 Australian national nutrition survey

Worsley, Anthony, Blasche, Roswitha, Ball, Kylie and Crawford, David 2004, The relationship between education and food consumption in the 1995 Australian national nutrition survey, Public health nutrition, vol. 7, no. 5, pp. 649-663.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
ball-relationshipbetweeneducation-2004.pdf Published version application/pdf 195.75KB 921

Title The relationship between education and food consumption in the 1995 Australian national nutrition survey
Author(s) Worsley, Anthony
Blasche, Roswitha
Ball, Kylie
Crawford, David
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 7
Issue number 5
Start page 649
End page 663
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Wallingford, England
Publication date 2004
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) food intake
age group
education
survey
Australia
Summary Objective: To assess the relationship between education and the intake of a variety of individual foods, as well as groups of foods, for Australian men and women in different age groups.

Design: Cross-sectional national survey of free-living men and women. Subjects: A sample of 2501 men and 2739 women aged 18 years and over who completed the National Nutrition Survey (NNS) 1995.

Methods: Information about the frequency of consumption of 88 food items was obtained using a food-frequency questionnaire in a nation-wide nutrition survey. Irregular and regular consumers of foods were identified according to whether they consumed individual foods less than or more than once per month. The relationship between single foods and an index of education (no post-school qualifications, vocational, university) was analysed via contingency table chi-square statistics for men and women. Food group variety scores were derived by assigning individual foods to conventional food group taxonomies, and then summing the dichotomised intake scores for individual foods within each food group. Two-way analyses of variance (education by age groups) were performed on food variety scores for men and women, separately.

Results: While university-educated men and women consumed many individual foods more regularly than less-educated people, they were less likely to be regular consumers of several meat products. The relationship between education and food consumption was less apparent when individual food scores were aggregated into food group scores. University-educated men and women exhibited higher scores on total food group variety than the other educational groups.

Conclusions: Higher education is associated with the regular consumption of a wider variety of foods. Aggregation of individual food consumption indices into food variety scores may mask the apparent effects of educational background on food consumption.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002435

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 17 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 550 Abstract Views, 921 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 08:24:39 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.