Openly accessible

Public definitions of success in weight management

Timperio, Anna and Crawford, David 2004, Public definitions of success in weight management, Nutrition & dietetics, vol. 61, no. 4, pp. 215-220.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
crawford-publicdefinitions-2004.pdf Published version application/pdf 493.12KB 145

Title Public definitions of success in weight management
Author(s) Timperio, Anna
Crawford, David
Journal name Nutrition & dietetics
Volume number 61
Issue number 4
Start page 215
End page 220
Publisher Dietitians Association of Australia
Place of publication Deakin, A.C.T.
Publication date 2004
ISSN 1446-6368
Keyword(s) community
overweight
perceptions
success
weight control
weight maintenance
Summary Objective: To examine perceptions of success in weight control and future weight-control intentions in a community sample. Design: Cross-sectional postal survey. Subjects: There were 1500 adults randomly selected from the Electoral Roll of Victoria (47% response). Setting: Community. Main outcome measures: Retrospective weight change over previous 12 months; perceived weight-control success; future weight-control intentions. Statistical analyses: Pearson's χ² tests were used to compare perceived weight-control success by sex, and by age, education level, initial BMI, amount of weight change and weight-loss behaviour within sex. ANOVA was used to compare mean weight change associated with perceived weight control success within sex, and within age, education, body mass index and weight-loss behaviour by sex. The distribution (frequency) of weight-control intentions are reported within perceived weight-control success and amount of weight change. Results: One in two (53%) reported maintaining their weight within 1kg in the preceding 12 months, 26% of men and 21% of women reported weight gain and 20% of men and 26% of women reported weight loss. Almost one-third (30%) of those who maintained their weight considered themselves unsuccessful. A majority of those who lost weight considered themselves successful at controlling their weight. However, more than 45% of men who gained weight also considered themselves successful. Those who considered themselves unsuccessful experienced less weight loss (1.1 ± 3.9kg) than those who considered themselves quite successful (-1.4 ± 4.5 kg, P < 0.001) or very successful (-1.3 ± 7.8 kg, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Public views of what constitutes successful weight control may need to be reoriented to be consistent with public health goals.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©Nutrition & Dietetics
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002441

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 471 Abstract Views, 145 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 08:24:49 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.