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Diet, nutrition and the prevention of excess weight gain and obesity

Swinburn, Boyd, Caterson, I., Seidell, J. C. and James, W. P. T. 2004, Diet, nutrition and the prevention of excess weight gain and obesity, Public health nutrition, vol. 7, no. 1(a), pp. 123-146, doi: 10.1079/PHN2003585.

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Title Diet, nutrition and the prevention of excess weight gain and obesity
Author(s) Swinburn, Boyd
Caterson, I.
Seidell, J. C.
James, W. P. T.
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 7
Issue number 1(a)
Start page 123
End page 146
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Cambridge, England
Publication date 2004-02
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) public health
overweight
obesity
evidence-base
Summary Objective: To review the evidence on the diet and nutrition causes of obesity and to recommend strategies to reduce obesity prevalence.
Design: The evidence for potential aetiological factors and strategies to reduce obesity prevalence was reviewed, and recommendations for public health action, population nutrition goals and further research were made.
Results: Protective factors against obesity were considered to be: regular physical activity (convincing); a high intake of dietary non-starch polysaccharides (NSP)/fibre (convincing); supportive home and school environments for children (probable); and breastfeeding (probable). Risk factors for obesity were considered to be sedentary lifestyles (convincing); a high intake of energy-dense, micronutrient-poor foods (convincing); heavy marketing of energy-dense foods and fast food outlets (probable); sugar-sweetened soft drinks and fruit juices (probable); adverse social and economic conditions—developed countries, especially in women (probable).
A broad range of strategies were recommended to reduce obesity prevalence including: influencing the food supply to make healthy choices easier; reducing the marketing of energy dense foods and beverages to children; influencing urban environments and transport systems to promote physical activity; developing community-wide programmes in multiple settings; increased communications about healthy eating and physical activity; and improved health services to promote breastfeeding and manage currently overweight or obese people.
Conclusions: The increasing prevalence of obesity is a major health threat in both low- and high income countries. Comprehensive programmes will be needed to turn the epidemic around.
Language eng
DOI 10.1079/PHN2003585
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Cambridge University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002458

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.