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How feasible are healthy eating and physical activity for young women?

Ball, Kylie, Crawford, David and Warren, Narelle 2004, How feasible are healthy eating and physical activity for young women?, Public health nutrition, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 433-441.

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Title How feasible are healthy eating and physical activity for young women?
Author(s) Ball, Kylie
Crawford, David
Warren, Narelle
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 7
Issue number 3
Start page 433
End page 441
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of publication Wallingford, United Kingdom
Publication date 2004
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) Feasibility study
Physical activity
Eating
Dietary guidelines
Young women
Obesity
Summary Objective: This study investigated young women’s perceptions of the feasibility of physical activity and healthy eating behaviours, and how these vary by socioeconomic status, domestic characteristics and weight status. Design: This population-based study used a mailed questionnaire to investigate perceptions of the feasibility of commonly recommended healthy eating and physical activity behaviours among a sample of young women. The feasibility of 29 physical activity behaviours (e.g. relating to frequency, intensity, duration, domain/setting) and 15 healthy eating behaviours (e.g. relating to location/setting, fruit and vegetable intake, fat/sugar intake) was assessed. Height, weight and sociodemographic details were also obtained. Setting: Nation-wide community-based survey. Subjects: A total of 445 women aged 18–32 years selected randomly from the Australian electoral roll. Results: Most women reported that they either were already engaged in many of the healthy eating behaviours or saw these as highly feasible. Many physical activity behaviours, on the other hand, were perceived as less feasible, particularly among women with children and women who were overweight. Conclusions: Health promotion messages and strategies aimed at increasing physical activity and healthy eating are unlikely to succeed unless they take into account perceptions that these behaviours are not feasible. For young women, this may involve promoting more time-effective, flexible ways of achieving recommended physical activity. Messages specifically targeted to women with children, and women who are overweight, are required.
Notes Published online by Cambridge University Press 02 Jan 2007
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Cambridge University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002503

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.