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Subjective quality of life and self-esteem in children: the role of primary and secondary control in coping with everyday stress

Marriage, Karen and Cummins, Robert 2004, Subjective quality of life and self-esteem in children: the role of primary and secondary control in coping with everyday stress, Social indicators research, vol. 66, no. 1-2, pp. 107-122, doi: 10.1023/B:SOCI.0000007493.32548.0c.

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Title Subjective quality of life and self-esteem in children: the role of primary and secondary control in coping with everyday stress
Author(s) Marriage, Karen
Cummins, RobertORCID iD for Cummins, Robert orcid.org/0000-0001-9014-7193
Journal name Social indicators research
Volume number 66
Issue number 1-2
Start page 107
End page 122
Publisher Kluwer Academic Publishers
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publication date 2004-04
ISSN 0303-8300
1573-0921
Summary Two major predictors of subjective quality oflife (SQOL) in adults are known to beself-esteem and a sense of primary control.Moreover, secondary control is known to be animportant defence strategy when primary controlfails. This study aimed to determine whetherthese relationships also apply to children. Asample of 66 children aged from 5 to 12 yearswere compared on their use of primary andsecondary control and on their ratings of SQOLand self-esteem. SQOL was measured using theComprehensive Quality of Life Scale,self-esteem by using the CoopersmithSelf-Esteem Inventory, and primary andsecondary control were measured by codingchildren's responses to three short video clipsof children in stressful situations. It wasfound that younger children use more primarycontrol and less secondary control than olderchildren. However, five year olds were foundcapable of producing secondary controlstrategies. Contrary to expectation, primaryand secondary control did not predict eitherself-esteem or SQOL. However, self-esteempredicted SQOL as expected and no sexdifferences were found. These findingsemphasise important differences from the adultliterature and the reasons for this arediscussed.
Notes Online Publication Date: 01 July 2006
Language eng
DOI 10.1023/B:SOCI.0000007493.32548.0c
Field of Research 170113 Social and Community Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Kluwer Academic Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002522

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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