Merely the man in the street: community consultation in the planning of 1920s Melbourne

Nichols, David 2004, Merely the man in the street: community consultation in the planning of 1920s Melbourne, Australian planner, vol. 41, no. 3, pp. 49-55.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Merely the man in the street: community consultation in the planning of 1920s Melbourne
Author(s) Nichols, David
Journal name Australian planner
Volume number 41
Issue number 3
Start page 49
End page 55
Publisher Royal Australian Planning Institute
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Publication date 2004
ISSN 0729-3682
Summary It is an accepted tenet of planning history that Australia's planning practice in the first half of the 20th century was dominated by experts delivering a package of international planning ideas. Is this story made more    complicated, however by the attitudes of the lay Australian to urban planning at this time? What role have the approaches of planners and planning  bodies played in advising the public of the best routes to take  towards comprehensive and appropriate planning? This paper discusses these  issues with use of examples of the general public's letters to  Melboume's Metropolitan Town Planning Commission (MTPC)( 1923-30) about planning issues in Melbourne; the MTPC's responses; and responsive propaganda generated by prominent Melbourne planner Saxil Tuxen (1885-1975).
Language eng
Field of Research 120599 Urban and Regional Planning not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002530

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Social and International Studies
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Access Statistics: 361 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 08:27:19 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.