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The effect of intellectual disability on children's recall of an event across different question types

Agnew, Sarah and Powell, Martine 2004, The effect of intellectual disability on children's recall of an event across different question types, Law and human behavior, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 273-294, doi: 10.1023/B:LAHU.0000029139.38127.61.

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Title The effect of intellectual disability on children's recall of an event across different question types
Author(s) Agnew, Sarah
Powell, MartineORCID iD for Powell, Martine orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Journal name Law and human behavior
Volume number 28
Issue number 3
Start page 273
End page 294
Publisher Plenum Pub. Corp.
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2004-06
ISSN 0147-7307
1573-661X
Keyword(s) children
intellectual disability
eyewitness
testimony
investigative interviewing
Summary This research examined the performance of 80 children aged 9–12 years with either a mild and moderate intellectual disability when recalling an innocuous event that was staged in their school. The children actively participated in a 30-min magic show, which included 21 specific target items. The first interview (held 3 days after the magic show) provided false and true biasing information about these 21 items. The second interview (held the following day) was designed to elicit the children's recall of the target details using the least number of specific prompts possible. The children's performance was compared with that of 2 control groups; a group of mainstream children matched for mental age and a group of mainstream children matched for chronological age. Overall, this study showed that children with either a mild or moderate intellectual disability can provide accurate and highly specific event-related information. However, their recall is less complete and less clear in response to free-narrative prompts and less accurate in response to specific questions when compared to both the mainstream age-matched groups. The implications of the findings for legal professionals and researchers are discussed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1023/B:LAHU.0000029139.38127.61
Field of Research 170103 Educational Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, American Psychology-Law Society/Division 41 of the American Psychology Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002638

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Higher Education Research Group
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