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Personality and responses to appetitive and aversive stimuli: the joint influence of behavioural approach and behavioural inhibition systems

Kambouropoulos, Nicolas and Staiger, Petra K. 2004, Personality and responses to appetitive and aversive stimuli: the joint influence of behavioural approach and behavioural inhibition systems, Personality and individual differences, vol. 37, no. 6, pp. 1153-1165, doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2003.11.019.

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Title Personality and responses to appetitive and aversive stimuli: the joint influence of behavioural approach and behavioural inhibition systems
Author(s) Kambouropoulos, Nicolas
Staiger, Petra K.
Journal name Personality and individual differences
Volume number 37
Issue number 6
Start page 1153
End page 1165
Publisher Pergamon
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2004
ISSN 0191-8869
1873-3549
Keyword(s) behavioural approach
behavioural inhibition
appetitive motivation
aversive motivation
impulsivity
anxiety
reinforcement sensitivity theory
Summary Gray’s reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) posits two separable neurological systems involved in the regulation of personality and behaviour. The behavioural approach and inhibition systems facilitate the expression of appetitive (impulsive-sensation seeking traits) and aversive motivation (anxiety traits), respectively. Inconsistent findings regarding associations between measures of personality and behavioural responses to appetitive and aversive stimuli has led to a modification of RST including the notion that, rather than separable as first hypothesised, the two systems jointly influence behaviour. The current study was designed to investigate this proposal with an additional focus on the role of reinforcement expectancies. Seventy-eight participants completed two questionnaire measures of BIS/BAS activity (EPQ-R, SPSRQ) and two behavioural measures (Q-TASK, Card Arranging Reward Responsivity Objective Task). Findings were in general consistent with the original separable systems approach, however they also showed that aversive responses were highest in high BAS/high BIS individuals, thus suggesting an interactive account of BIS/BAS processes. Further, stronger positive correlations between self-report BAS traits and behavioural reward responsiveness were found for participants who perceived the task as more rewarding than initially expected. Discussion focuses on the role of reward expectancies and on the issue regarding separable vs. joint BIS/BAS systems.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2003.11.019
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2003, Elsevier Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002698

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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