You are not logged in.

Performance of intensively farmed Murray cod Maccullochella peelii peelii (Mitchell) fed newly formulated vs. currently used commercial diets, and a comparison of fillet composition of farmed and wild fish

De Silva, Sena, Gunasekera, Rasanthi M. and Ingram, Brett A. 2004, Performance of intensively farmed Murray cod Maccullochella peelii peelii (Mitchell) fed newly formulated vs. currently used commercial diets, and a comparison of fillet composition of farmed and wild fish, Aquaculture research, vol. 35, no. 11, pp. 1039-1052, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2109.2004.01111.x.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Performance of intensively farmed Murray cod Maccullochella peelii peelii (Mitchell) fed newly formulated vs. currently used commercial diets, and a comparison of fillet composition of farmed and wild fish
Formatted title Performance of intensively farmed Murray cod Maccullochella peelii peelii (Mitchell) fed newly formulated vs. currently used commercial diets, and a comparison of fillet composition of farmed and wild fish
Author(s) De Silva, Sena
Gunasekera, Rasanthi M.
Ingram, Brett A.
Journal name Aquaculture research
Volume number 35
Issue number 11
Start page 1039
End page 1052
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publication date 2004
ISSN 1355-557X
1365-2109
Keyword(s) Murray cod Maccullochella peelii peelii
fatty acids
fillet quality
food conversion efficiency
commercial
diets
growth
intensive culture
Summary Murray cod is a top-order carnivore with high culture potential. Currently, there are no commercial diets formulated specifically for Murray cod. In this study, results of two growth trials on Murray cod (80–83.5-g mean initial weight), conducted in commercial settings, using two laboratory-formulated diets (DU1 and DU2; 48.9% and 49.1% protein, and 16.9% and 16.1% lipid, respectively, on a dry matter basis), and two commercial diets, formulated for other species (salmon – CD/S and barramundi – CD/B) but used in Murray cod farming are presented. The two commercial diets had less protein (46.6% and 44.4%) but higher lipid (21.7% and 19.5%). The energy content of the feeds tested was similar (about 20–22 kJ g−1). The growth performance and feed utilization of Murray cod did not differ significantly amongst the diets, but the food conversion ratio and % protein efficiency ratio in fish fed the DU1 and DU2 diets were consistently better. There was significantly less carcass and muscle lipid deposition in fish fed with the latter diets. Of the fatty acids in muscle, the lowest amounts (in μg mg lipid−1) of n-3 (262.5±2.9), n-6 (39.8±0.9) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) (302.3±3.8) were observed in fish fed CD/S, and the highest in fish fed DU2 and CD/B. Fatty acids 16:0 and 18:0, 18:1n-9 and 16:1n-7, and 22:6n-3, 20:5n-3, 22:5n-3 and 18:2n-6 were the dominant fatty acids amongst the saturates, monoenes and PUFA, respectively, and accounted for 80.8–88.7% of all identified fatty acids (23) in muscle of Murray cod. The study showed that Murray cod could be cultured successfully on a diet (DU2) containing 20% soybean meal without compromising growth and/or carcass quality. Differences in the proximate composition and fatty acid composition of muscle of wild and farmed Murray cod were observed, the most obvious being in the latter. Wild Murray cod had significantly less (P<0.05) saturates (192.6±1.84 vs. 266.3±3.51), monoenes (156.5±8.7 vs. 207.6±6.19), n-3 (145.2±5.24 vs. 261.8±3.2) but higher n-6 (144.3±2.73 vs. 48.3±1.38) in muscle (all values are in μg mg lipid−1) than in farmed fish. Wild fish also had a much lower n-3 to n-6 ratio (1.0±0.03 vs. 5.4±0.09).
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2109.2004.01111.x
Field of Research 070401 Aquaculture
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002710

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Ecology and Environment
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 23 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 23 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 590 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 08:32:20 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.