Postoperative pulmonary dysfunction in adults after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: clinical significance and implications for practice

Wynne, Rochelle and Botti, Mari 2004, Postoperative pulmonary dysfunction in adults after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: clinical significance and implications for practice, American journal of critical care, vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 384-393.

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Title Postoperative pulmonary dysfunction in adults after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: clinical significance and implications for practice
Author(s) Wynne, Rochelle
Botti, Mari
Journal name American journal of critical care
Volume number 13
Issue number 5
Start page 384
End page 393
Publisher American Association of Critical Care Nurses
Place of publication Aliso Viejo, CA
Publication date 2004-09
ISSN 1062-3264
Keyword(s) coronary artery bypass
adverse effects
lung diseases
etiology
postoperative complications
Summary Postoperative pulmonary complications are the most frequent and significant contributor to morbidity, mortality, and costs associated with hospitalization. Interestingly, despite the prevalence of these complications in cardiac surgical patients, recognition, diagnosis, and management of this problem vary widely. In addition, little information is available on the continuum between routine postoperative pulmonary dysfunction and postoperative pulmonary complications. The course of events from pulmonary dysfunction associated with surgery to discharge from the hospital in cardiac patients is largely unexplored. In the absence of evidence-based practice guidelines for the care of cardiac surgical patients with postoperative pulmonary dysfunction, an understanding of the path ophysiological basis of the development of postoperative pulmonary complications is fundamental to enable clinicians to assess the value of current management interventions. Previous research on postoperative pulmonary dysfunction in adults undergoing cardiac surgery is reviewed, with an emphasis on the pathogenesis of this problem, implications for clinical nursing practice, and possibilities for future research.
Language eng
Field of Research 111003 Clinical Nursing: Secondary (Acute Care)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©American Association of Critical Care Nurses
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002720

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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