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Spatial and temporal definition of Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus (Thomson) (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Gippsland Lakes system of eastern Victoria

Barton, Philip, Aberton, John and Kay, Brian 2004, Spatial and temporal definition of Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus (Thomson) (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Gippsland Lakes system of eastern Victoria, Australian journal of entomology, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 16-22, doi: 10.1111/j.1440-6055.2004.00405.x.

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Title Spatial and temporal definition of Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus (Thomson) (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Gippsland Lakes system of eastern Victoria
Formatted title Spatial and temporal definition of Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus (Thomson) (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Gippsland Lakes system of eastern Victoria
Author(s) Barton, Philip
Aberton, John
Kay, Brian
Journal name Australian journal of entomology
Volume number 43
Issue number 1
Start page 16
End page 22
Publisher Australian Entomological Society
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Publication date 2004
ISSN 1326-6756
1440-6055
Keyword(s) culicidae
Gippsland Lakes
Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus
saltmarsh mosquito
Victoria
Summary The confirmed vector of Ross River virus, Ochlerotatus camptorhynchus (Thomson), is the dominant mosquito species inhabiting saline marshes in coastal Victoria. This paper re-examines previously published data on Oc. camptorhynchus, plus additional data collected since that time, and provides greater spatial and temporal definition of Oc. camptorhynchus numbers at seven sites across the Gippsland Lakes system of eastern Victoria. A total of 357 672 Oc. camptorhynchus was captured from 1188 trap-nights across the seven trap sites during trapping seasons from 1990 to 2001. The  dominance of Oc. camptorhynchus across the seven sites averaged 75%, with significant differences in mean abundance of Oc. camptorhynchus found between all trap sites. Significant differences in monthly abundance of Oc. camptorhynchus were observed for Wellington Shire. Increase in populations of Oc. camptorhynchus was associated with increases in rainfall at all trap sites, higher minimum temperatures at two of the seven trap sites, and wind speed at one trap site. Prioritisation of mosquito control may be applied based on spatial and temporal factors according to the findings of this study.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-6055.2004.00405.x
Field of Research 050299 Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30002746

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Ecology and Environment
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