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Does successful treatment of constipation or faecal impaction resolve lower urinary tract symptoms? A structured review of the literature

Ostaszkiewicz, Joan, Ski, Chantal and Hornby, Linda 2005, Does successful treatment of constipation or faecal impaction resolve lower urinary tract symptoms? A structured review of the literature, Australian and New Zealand continence journal, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 70-80.

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Title Does successful treatment of constipation or faecal impaction resolve lower urinary tract symptoms? A structured review of the literature
Author(s) Ostaszkiewicz, JoanORCID iD for Ostaszkiewicz, Joan orcid.org/0000-0003-4159-4493
Ski, Chantal
Hornby, Linda
Journal name Australian and New Zealand continence journal
Volume number 11
Issue number 3
Start page 70
End page 80
Publisher Cambridge Media
Place of publication West Leederville, W.A.
Publication date 2005
ISSN 1448-0131
Keyword(s) constipation
urinary incontinence
lower urinary tract symptoms
faecal impaction
stool impaction
functional constipation
quality of life
Summary Consensus guidelines advocate the treatment of constipation and faecal impaction in order to improve symptoms of urinary frequency, urgency and urinary incontinence and to promote bladder emptying in the absence of urinary tract obstruction. This structured review of the literature was undertaken to search for and appraise evidence to support or negate the hypothesis of this relationship. The search strategy was comprehensive and identified six relevant studies. Two of these had been conducted on an adult population and four studies involved children with constipation. These studies were appraised for methodological quality. It was found that sample sizes were small and evidence was inconsistent. Variable methods of reporting meant that data were not able to be pooled for meta-analysis.
Based on the limited and conflicting evidence, it is recommended that further research be undertaken to identify any correlation between bowel and bladder function.
Language eng
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Australian & New Zealand Continence Journal
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003083

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.