Which work characteristics predict employee outcomes for the public-sector employee? An examination of generic and occupation-specific characteristics

Noblet, Andrew, Teo, Stephen T. T., McWilliams, John and Rodwell, John J. 2005, Which work characteristics predict employee outcomes for the public-sector employee? An examination of generic and occupation-specific characteristics, International journal of human resource management, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 1415-1430.

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Title Which work characteristics predict employee outcomes for the public-sector employee? An examination of generic and occupation-specific characteristics
Author(s) Noblet, Andrew
Teo, Stephen T. T.
McWilliams, John
Rodwell, John J.
Journal name International journal of human resource management
Volume number 16
Issue number 8
Start page 1415
End page 1430
Total pages 16 p.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2005-08
ISSN 0958-5192
1466-4399
Keyword(s) new public management
occupational stress
employee well-being
Summary The wide-ranging changes that have occurred in the public sector over recent years have placed increasing demands on public-sector employees. A survey of employees within a relatively commercially-oriented public-sector organization in Australia was used to test a demand-oriented generic model of employee well-being and a variety of situation-specific variables. The presence of support at work and the amount of control an employee had over their job were found to be key predictors of employee-level outcomes. Perceptions of pay and the perception of a lack of human resources (HR) were also found to predict employee outcome variables. The results emphasize the impact that middle managers and HR managers can have in terms of reducing the detrimental employee effects that can be caused by the introduction of new public management (NPM) and the potential for a positive impact on employees. In particular, public-sector managers can use the design of jobs and the development of social support mechanisms, such as employee assistance programmes, to maintain, if not improve, the quality of working life experienced by their employees. More broadly, this study has found that the job strain model is a useful tool in a public-sector environment and is likely to be of increasing utility with the continuing introduction or consolidation of NPM over time. Managing these issues in the new public sector could be a key means of protecting the key resource of the Australian public sector - the employees.
Language eng
Field of Research 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003109

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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