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The effect of events context on children's recall of non-experienced events across mutiple interviews

Jones, Carolyn and Powell, Martine 2005, The effect of events context on children's recall of non-experienced events across mutiple interviews, Legal and criminological psychology, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 83-101.

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Title The effect of events context on children's recall of non-experienced events across mutiple interviews
Author(s) Jones, Carolyn
Powell, MartineORCID iD for Powell, Martine orcid.org/0000-0001-5092-1308
Journal name Legal and criminological psychology
Volume number 10
Issue number 1
Start page 83
End page 101
Publisher British Psychological Society
Place of publication Leicester, England
Publication date 2005-02
ISSN 1355-3259
2044-8333
Summary Purpose: The current study examined whether young children's willingness to assent to, and provide details about, a false (non-experienced) activity differs depending on whether the activity was allegedly embedded within (a) a specific event or (b) a broad (non-specified) time frame.
Method
:  Ninety-nine children aged 4--5 years (from both low and high socioeconomic backgrounds) either (a) participated in a staged event that consisted of two activities or (b) did not participate in the staged event. One or two days later, all children were given false suggestions about a non-experienced (false) activity that had either high or low plausibility. Approximately 8, 15, and 22 days after the event, children were asked to recall the activities, and to answer a series of specific cued-recall questions.
Results
: There was no effect of event context on assent rates, and the rate at which children reported interviewer suggestions. However, children who participated in the staged event provided fewer details about the false activity. Further, among those children who assented to the false activity, fewer subjects, objects, actions, temporal markers, locations, fantastic/improbable details, and confabulation errors were reported when the activity was embedded within the specific staged event.
Conclusion: The degree of error in children's accounts of a completely false activity is reduced when the activity is suggested to have occurred within a specified event as opposed to a broad (non-specified) time frame.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2005, The British Psychological Society
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003121

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.