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Children's perceptions of their home and neighborhood environments, and their association with objectively measured physical activity: A qualitative and quantitative study

Hume, Clare, Salmon, Jo and Ball, Kylie 2005, Children's perceptions of their home and neighborhood environments, and their association with objectively measured physical activity: A qualitative and quantitative study, Health education research: theory & practice, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 1-13.

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Title Children's perceptions of their home and neighborhood environments, and their association with objectively measured physical activity: A qualitative and quantitative study
Author(s) Hume, Clare
Salmon, Jo
Ball, Kylie
Journal name Health education research: theory & practice
Volume number 20
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 13
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2005
ISSN 0268-1153
1465-3648
Summary Environmental factors may have an important influence on children’s physical activity, yet children’s perspectives of their home and neighborhood environments have not been widely assessed. The aim of this study was to investigate children’s perceptions of their environments, and to examine associations between these perceptions and objectively measured physical activity. The sample consisted of 147, 10-year-old Australian children, who drew maps of their home and neighborhood environments. A subsample of children photographed places and things in these environments that were important to them. The maps were analyzed for themes, and for the frequency with which particular objects and locations appeared. Physical activity was objectively measured using accelerometers. Six themes emerged from the qualitative analysis of the maps and photographs: the family home; opportunities for physical activity and sedentary pursuits; food items and locations; green space and outside areas; the school and opportunities for social interaction. Of the 11 variables established from these themes, one home and two neighborhood factors were associated with children’s physical activity. These findings contribute to a broader understanding of children’s perceptions of their environment, and highlight the potential importance of the home and neighborhood environments for promoting physical activity behavior.
Notes Advance Access publication 14 July 2004
Language eng
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ┬ęThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication by Health Education Research: Theory & Practice following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Hume, Clare, Salmon, Jo and Ball, Kylie 2005, Children's perceptions of their home and neighborhood environments, and their association with objectively measured physical activity: A qualitative and quantitative study, Health education research: theory & practice, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 1-13., is available online a http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/her/cyg095.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003130

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.