Openly accessible

Safety of low-carbohydrate diets

Crowe, Timothy 2005, Safety of low-carbohydrate diets, Obesity reviews, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 235-245.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
crowe-safetyoflowcarbohydrate-2005.pdf Author's post print application/pdf 168.71KB 890

Title Safety of low-carbohydrate diets
Author(s) Crowe, Timothy
Journal name Obesity reviews
Volume number 6
Issue number 3
Start page 235
End page 245
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2005
ISSN 1467-7881
1467-789X
Keyword(s) diets
health risks
low-carbohydrate diet
safety
Summary Low-carbohydrate diets have re-emerged into the public spotlight and are enjoying a high degree of popularity as people search for a solution to the population's ever-expanding waistline. The current evidence though indicates that low-carbohydrate diets present no significant advantage over more traditional energy-restricted diets on long-term weight loss and maintenance. Furthermore, a higher rate of adverse side-effects can be attributed to low-carbohydrate dieting approaches. Short-term efficacy of low-carbohydrate diets has been demonstrated for some lipid parameters of cardiovascular risk and measures of glucose control and insulin sensitivity, but no studies have ascertained if these effects represent a change in primary outcome measures. Low-carbohydrate diets are likely effective and not harmful in the short term and may have therapeutic benefits for weight-related chronic diseases although weight loss on such a program should be undertaken under medical supervision. While new commercial incarnations of the low-carbohydrate diet are now addressing overall dietary adequacy by encouraging plenty of high-fibre vegetables, fruit, low-glycaemic-index carbohydrates and healthier fat sources, this is not the message that reaches the entire public nor is it the type of diet adopted by many people outside of the world of a well-designed clinical trial. Health effects of long-term ad hoc restriction of inherently beneficial food groups without a concomitant reduction in body weight remains unanswered.
Notes The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, International Association for the Study of Obesity
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003143

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 35 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 38 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 854 Abstract Views, 890 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2008, 08:44:38 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.