A prospective study of pressures from parents, peers, and the media on extreme weight change behaviors among adolescent boys and girls

McCabe, Marita and Ricciardelli, Lina 2005, A prospective study of pressures from parents, peers, and the media on extreme weight change behaviors among adolescent boys and girls, Behaviour research and therapy, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 653-668.

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Title A prospective study of pressures from parents, peers, and the media on extreme weight change behaviors among adolescent boys and girls
Author(s) McCabe, Marita
Ricciardelli, Lina
Journal name Behaviour research and therapy
Volume number 43
Issue number 5
Start page 653
End page 668
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2005-05
ISSN 0005-7967
Keyword(s) sociocultural influences
lose weight
increase muscles
adolescent
longitudinal
Summary The current study was designed to evaluate the role of sociocultural influences over a 16 month period on strategies to lose weight, extreme weight loss strategies, and strategies to increase muscles among adolescent boys (n=344) and girls (n=246). All participants completed measures of body dissatisfaction, body image importance, strategies to lose weight, extreme weight loss strategies, and strategies to increase muscles. Measures of perceived pressure to lose weight or increase muscles from mother, father, best male friend, best female friend and the media were also evaluated. Data were gathered on three occasions, 8 months apart. The results demonstrated that boys showed a decrease in strategies to lose weight and increase muscles over time, whereas girls showed an increase. Both boys and girls showed an increase in extreme weight loss strategies with girls demonstrating a greater increase than boys. The sociocultural influences generally were perceived by girls to relate to messages to lose weight, whereas for boys they were perceived to relate to increasing muscles. Messages from parents, particularly fathers, were strong predictors of both strategies to lose weight and increase muscles among boys, with the media and best male friend playing a limited role. For girls, the strongest influences were mothers and best female friends, with few influences from fathers or the media. The results of this study are discussed in terms of the importance of the various sociocultural influences in shaping body change strategies among young adolescent boys and girls, and the implications of these findings for intervention programs for adolescents.
Notes Available online 21 July 2004.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2004, Elsevier Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003161

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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