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Tensions and constraints for nurses in hospital-in-home programmes

Duke, Maxine and Street, Annette 2005, Tensions and constraints for nurses in hospital-in-home programmes, International journal of nursing practice, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. 221-227.

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Title Tensions and constraints for nurses in hospital-in-home programmes
Author(s) Duke, MaxineORCID iD for Duke, Maxine orcid.org/0000-0003-1567-3956
Street, Annette
Journal name International journal of nursing practice
Volume number 11
Issue number 5
Start page 221
End page 227
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of publication Carlton, Vic.
Publication date 2005-10
ISSN 1322-7114
1440-172X
Keyword(s) economic constraints
holistic care
hospital-in-the-home
nurses
tensions
Summary Economic necessity constrains health-care expenditure and waiting lists for hospital treatments remain high. As a result, more care is delivered via alternative means, such as same-day surgery initiatives and home-care programmes. Acute care delivered in the home to patients who would otherwise require hospitalization is becoming an increasingly acceptable means of treatment. These Hospital-in-the-Home programmes offer increased comfort while delivering comparable outcomes to many patient groups. The purpose of this paper is to generate discussion concerning the tensions that exist for nurses who practice in the home under the auspices of acute-care institutions. Data drawn from field work that formed part of a critical ethnography is used to generate the discussion. The larger research project explored the constructions of the role of the nurse in four Hospital-in-the-Home programmes in Victoria, Australia. It will be argued that there is significant pressure exerted upon nurses to support the imperative to reduce bed days in acute hospitals by transferring people to their home. At times, this agenda clashes with the nurses’ professional commitment to provide holistic patient care yet the dilemmas are largely unacknowledged and/or unrecognized by the nurses despite the tension they generate.
Language eng
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©International journal of nursing practice
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003234

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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