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Still suffering from the `silo effect`: lingering cultural barriers to collaborative care

Lane, Karen 2005, Still suffering from the `silo effect`: lingering cultural barriers to collaborative care, Canadian journal of midwifery research and practice, vol. 4, no. 1, Spring, pp. 8-16.

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Title Still suffering from the `silo effect`: lingering cultural barriers to collaborative care
Author(s) Lane, Karen
Journal name Canadian journal of midwifery research and practice
Volume number 4
Issue number 1
Season Spring
Start page 8
End page 16
Publisher Canadian Association of Midwives
Place of publication Hamilton, Ont.
Publication date 2005
ISSN 1703-2121
Keyword(s) old and new professionalism
collaborative care
medical and social models of birth
social constructionist models of knowledge
Summary This research project sought to draw out the contesting definitions of collaborative care among professional subgroups in maternity services. The paper contrasts medical and social models of knowledge and reports on qualitative evidence from midwives and doctors in Australian hospitals. The evidence indicates that collaborative care is welcomed by both midwives and doctors but that there remains a lingering residue of the ‘silo effect’ of the ‘old’ professionalism, characterized by hierarchical relations, divergent philosophies and competing domains. Although a ‘new professionalism’ has emerged that challenges the old hierarchies and professional dependencies, it too harbours lingering residues of the former dichotomy between midwives and obstetricians. These tensions and enmities will need to be resolved before genuine collaboration may take full effect. The objective is a relationship focused model of care that transcends professional or woman-focused models. The ‘new’ professionalism may be expedited through mediation strategies, a version of which is the ‘sociological intervention method’ discussed in this article.
Language eng
Field of Research 111717 Primary Health Care
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Canadian Association of Midwives
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003355

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of History, Heritage and Society
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.