Water-binding capacity and viscosity of Australian sweet lupin kernel fibre under in vitro conditions simulating the human upper gastrointestinal tract

Turnbull, Cathryn M., Baxter, Amynta L. and Johnson, Stuart 2005, Water-binding capacity and viscosity of Australian sweet lupin kernel fibre under in vitro conditions simulating the human upper gastrointestinal tract, International journal of food sciences and nutrition, vol. 56, no. 2, pp. 87-94.

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Title Water-binding capacity and viscosity of Australian sweet lupin kernel fibre under in vitro conditions simulating the human upper gastrointestinal tract
Formatted title Water-binding capacity and viscosity of Australian sweet lupin kernel fibre under in vitro conditions simulating the human upper gastrointestinal tract
Author(s) Turnbull, Cathryn M.
Baxter, Amynta L.
Johnson, Stuart
Journal name International journal of food sciences and nutrition
Volume number 56
Issue number 2
Start page 87
End page 94
Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
Place of publication Abingdon, England
Publication date 2005
ISSN 0963-7486
1465-3478
Summary There is currently little understanding of the physicochemical properties in the human gastrointestinal tract of Australian sweet lupin (Lupinus angustifolius) kernel fibre (LKF), a novel food ingredient with potential for the fibre enrichment of foods such as baked goods. Since physicochemical properties of dietary fibres have been related to beneficial physiological effects in vitro, this study compared water-binding capacity and viscosity of LKF with that of other fibres currently used for fibre-enrichment of baked goods, under in vitro conditions simulating the human upper gastrointestinal tract. At between 8.47 and 11.07g water/g dry solids, LKF exhibited water-binding capacities that were significantly higher (P<0.05) than soy fibre, pea hull fibre, cellulose and wheat fibre at all of the simulated gastrointestinal stages examined. Similarly, viscosity of LKF was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of the other fibres at all simulated gastrointestinal stages. The relatively high water-binding capacity and viscosity of LKF identified in this study suggests that this novel fibre ingredient may elicit different and possibly more beneficial physiological effects in the upper human gastrointestinal tract than the conventional fibre ingredients currently used in fibre-enriched baked goods manufacture. We are now performing human studies to investigate the effect of LKF in the diet on health-related gastrointestinal events.
Language eng
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2005, Taylor & Francis Group Ltd
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003434

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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