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Changes in attitudes to mothers working: evidence from Australian surveys

Blunsdon, Betsy and Reed, Ken 2005, Changes in attitudes to mothers working: evidence from Australian surveys, Labour & industry, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 15-27.

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Title Changes in attitudes to mothers working: evidence from Australian surveys
Author(s) Blunsdon, Betsy
Reed, Ken
Journal name Labour & industry
Volume number 16
Issue number 2
Start page 15
End page 27
Publisher Griffith University
Place of publication Nathan, Qld.
Publication date 2005-12
ISSN 1030-1763
Summary The aim of this article is to contribute to the development of our  understanding of two aspects of attitude change in Australia. First, both cohort and individual explanations for attitude change are tested empirically. Second, empirical evidence is provided about the nature and scope of change in gender role attitudes amongst males and females, and of different birth cohorts in Australia, as reported in two survey periods: 1994 and 2002. In particular, the question of whether there is empirical evidence of cohort differences in attitudes to gender roles in Australia is investigated. TheThe aim of this article is to contribute to the development of our understanding of two aspects of attitude change in Australia. First, both cohort and individual explanations for attitude change are tested empirically. Second, empirical evidence is provided about the nature and scope of change in gender role attitudes amongst males and females, and of different birth cohorts in Australia, as reported in two survey periods: 1994 and 2002. In particular, the question of whether there is empirical evidence of cohort differences in attitudes to gender roles in Australia is investigated. The findings show that birth cohorts display progressively more modern attitudes, but people tend not to change their attitudes as they get older. In addition, men and women have different attitudes to gender roles, with men displaying more traditional beliefs than women. Having more than one child makes women less inclined to express the belief that women should work.
Language eng
Field of Research 160805 Social Change
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003457

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Deakin Graduate School of Business
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