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Prediction intention to quit in the call centre industry: does the retail model fit?

Siong, Zhong Ming Bejamin, Mellor, David, Moore, Kathleen A. and Firth, Lucy 2006, Prediction intention to quit in the call centre industry: does the retail model fit?, Journal of managerial psychology, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 231-243.

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Title Prediction intention to quit in the call centre industry: does the retail model fit?
Author(s) Siong, Zhong Ming Bejamin
Mellor, David
Moore, Kathleen A.
Firth, Lucy
Journal name Journal of managerial psychology
Volume number 21
Issue number 3
Start page 231
End page 243
Publisher Emerald Publishing Group
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2006
ISSN 0268-3946
1758-7778
Keyword(s) call centres
employee turnover
stress
Australia
Summary Purpose – Models of workplace turnover are rarely assessed in contexts other than that in which they were developed. This reduces their generalizability and their usefulness in providing managers with guidance as to what they might do to reduce workers intentions to quit. The purpose of this study is to test a model derived from a study of shop floor retail salespeople in the call centre environment.

Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire measuring the variables in the model was completed by 126 call centre representatives recruited from 11 call centres in Melbourne, Australia.

Findings – Although the model was supported, the interactions among the variables differed. In particular, stressors played a bigger, albeit indirect, role in the intention to quit.

Practical implications – Call centre managers need to consider carefully the aspects of the work environment that may be stressful. If appropriately addressed, turnover may be reduced, and productivity increased.

Originality/value – This paper demonstrates that the model of turnover derived from shop floor salespeople is generally robust in the call centre setting. It provides management of call centres with some guidance as to the factors associated with turnover and areas that can be addressed to reduce it.
Notes Reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2006, Emerald Publishing Group
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003588

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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