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Identity in multicultural societies: who do we think we are?

Kennedy, Wendy L. and Hall, John 2006, Identity in multicultural societies: who do we think we are?, International journal of diversity in organisations, communities and nations, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 123-134.

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Title Identity in multicultural societies: who do we think we are?
Author(s) Kennedy, Wendy L.
Hall, John
Journal name International journal of diversity in organisations, communities and nations
Volume number 6
Issue number 2
Start page 123
End page 134
Publisher Common Ground Publishing
Place of publication Altona, Vic.
Publication date 2006
ISSN 1447-9532
1447-9583
Keyword(s) ethnic identity
multicultural societies
subjective ethnic identity
Summary This paper examines identity issues in multicultural Australia. In its extreme, negative form, assumptions that certain characteristics apply to all members of an ethnic group can be attributed to racism. However, the belief that individuals who share the same ethnic background have similar needs, interests and perceptions is also reflected in business, government policy and academic research. Often, ethnic groupings used for research and policy formulation are very broad and fail to take into account within-group differences. The criteria used to assess an individuals membership of an ethnic group can be problematic. Criteria based purely on objective measures such as country of birth or ethnic ancestry do not take into account acculturation processes or the degree to which individuals consider themselves to be 'ethnic '. These objective measures are complicated further as individuals may have ethnic roots from multiple countries depending on their family composition over several generations. This theory-focused paper proposes that ethnic identity should be viewed as a subjective phenomenon where individuals are likely to align themselves with the ethnic background to which they most identify. This has implications for research and policy making in multicultural societies.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 150599 Marketing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Common Ground Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003614

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.