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Children's television viewing and objectively measured physical activity: associations with family circumstances

Hesketh, Kylie, Crawford, David and Salmon, Jo 2006, Children's television viewing and objectively measured physical activity: associations with family circumstances, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 3, no. 36, pp. 1-10.

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Title Children's television viewing and objectively measured physical activity: associations with family circumstances
Author(s) Hesketh, Kylie
Crawford, David
Salmon, Jo
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 3
Issue number 36
Start page 1
End page 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2006
ISSN 1479-5868
Summary Background: The contribution of family circumstance to physical activity and television viewing has not been widely investigated in pre-adolescents, and available information is inconsistent. This study examines whether television viewing and objectively measured physical activity vary by different indicators of family circumstance.
Methods: Data from the 2001 Children's Leisure Activity Study and the 2002/3 Health, Eating and Play Study, involving Australian children in Grades Prep (mean age 6y) and 5–6 (mean age 11y), were combined. Children wore accelerometers for six consecutive 24 hour periods. Average min/day in low-intensity activity (1.0–1.9 METs) and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity (≥3 METs) were calculated. Parents reported children's television viewing and family circumstance. Linear regression analyses were conducted separately for young girls, young boys, older girls and older boys. Results: Complete data were available for 2458 children. Parental education and, to a lesser extent, employment level were inversely associated with television viewing. Children in single-parent families, those whose fathers were not in paid employment, and those without siblings tended to spend more time in low-intensity activity than their peers. Children with siblings spent more time in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity; associations were stronger for girls. Maternal education was positively associated with moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity for younger children. Maternal employment was positively associated with moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity for older children. Multivariable models did not demonstrate a cumulative explanatory effect.
Conclusion:
  Individual measures of family circumstance were differentially associated with television, low-intensity activity and moderate-to-vigorous-intensity activity and associations were often not consistent across age-by-gender groups. Interventions may need to be tailored accordingly.
Notes This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Language eng
Field of Research 111704 Community Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Hesketh et al
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003668

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.