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An investigation of psychological, social and environmental correlates of obesity and weight gain in young women

Ball, Kylie and Crawford, David 2006, An investigation of psychological, social and environmental correlates of obesity and weight gain in young women, International journal of obesity : journal of the international association for the study of obesity, vol. 30, pp. 1240-1249.

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Title An investigation of psychological, social and environmental correlates of obesity and weight gain in young women
Author(s) Ball, Kylie
Crawford, David
Journal name International journal of obesity : journal of the international association for the study of obesity
Volume number 30
Start page 1240
End page 1249
Publisher Nature Pub.
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2006
ISSN 0307-0565
1476-5497
Keyword(s) weight gain
young women
longitudinal
public health
Summary Objectives: This study explored the biological, psychological, social and environmental correlates of young women's current weight and retrospective 2-year weight change. Methods: A total of 790 young women (mean age 26.8 years), sampled from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health, provided self-reported data on their height and weight, sociodemographics and a range of biological, psychological, social and environmental variables. Results: Several variables from all domains (biological, psychological, social support and environmental) were correlated with higher body mass index, and less strongly greater 2-year weight change. Key correlates included the tendency to never put on weight, no matter what; self-efficacy for avoiding weight gain, and for healthy eating; attention paid to weight; family support and friends' support/sabotage of physical activity/healthy eating; and perceived difficulty of taking the stairs rather than the elevator as part of the daily routine. Conclusions: Intervention strategies aimed at reducing weight gain and obesity may need to focus on social and environmental, as well as psychological factors; however, further research is necessary to confirm these findings given that a number of hypothesized associations were not observed.

Notes published online 21 February 2006
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003677

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.