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Socio-economic inequalities in women`s fruit and vegetable intakes: a multilevel study of individual, social and environmental mediators

Ball, Kylie, Crawford, David and Mishra, Gita 2006, Socio-economic inequalities in women`s fruit and vegetable intakes: a multilevel study of individual, social and environmental mediators, Public health nutrition, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 623-630.

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Title Socio-economic inequalities in women`s fruit and vegetable intakes: a multilevel study of individual, social and environmental mediators
Author(s) Ball, Kylie
Crawford, David
Mishra, Gita
Journal name Public health nutrition
Volume number 9
Issue number 5
Start page 623
End page 630
Publisher CAB International
Place of publication Wallingford, England
Publication date 2006-08
ISSN 1368-9800
1475-2727
Keyword(s) fruit consumption
vegetable consumption
socio-economic status
multilevel study
Summary Objective: This study employed a multilevel design to test the contribution of individual, social and environmental factors to mediating socio-economic status (SES) inequalities in fruit and vegetable consumption among women. Design: A cross-sectional survey was linked with objective environmental data. Setting: A community sample involving 45 neighbourhoods. Subjects: In total, 1347 women from 45 neighbourhoods provided survey data on their SES (highest education level), nutrition knowledge, health considerations related to food purchasing, and social support for healthy eating. These data were linked with objective environmental data on the density of supermarkets and fruit and vegetable outlets in local neighbourhoods. Results: Multilevel modelling showed that individual and social factors partly mediated, but did not completely explain, SES variations in fruit and vegetable consumption. Store density did not mediate the relationship of SES with fruit or vegetable consumption. Conclusions: Nutrition promotion interventions should focus on enhancing nutrition knowledge and health considerations underlying food purchasing in order to promote healthy eating, particularly among those who are socio-economically disadvantaged. Further investigation is required to identify additional potential mediators of SES–diet relationships, particularly at the environmental level.
Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003680

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.