An experimental study of low velocity impact response in 2/2 twill weave composite laminates manufactured by a novel fabrication process

Zhang, Jin and Fox, Bronwyn 2007, An experimental study of low velocity impact response in 2/2 twill weave composite laminates manufactured by a novel fabrication process, Journal of materials science, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 232-238.

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Title An experimental study of low velocity impact response in 2/2 twill weave composite laminates manufactured by a novel fabrication process
Author(s) Zhang, Jin
Fox, Bronwyn
Journal name Journal of materials science
Volume number 42
Issue number 1
Start page 232
End page 238
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2007-01
ISSN 1573-4803
0022-2461
Keyword(s) materials
Summary A novel fabrication process for advanced composite components—the QuicktepTM process was described. 2/2 twill weave MTM56/CF0300 carbon epoxy composite laminates were manufactured by the Quickstep and the autoclave processes. The response of these laminates to drop-weight low velocity impact at energy levels ranging from 5 to 30 J was investigated. It was found that the laminates fabricated by the Quickstep had better impact damage tolerance than those fabricated by the autoclave. Optical microscopy revealed extensive matrix fracture in the center of the backside of the autoclave laminates indicating the more brittle property of the epoxy matrix cured by the autoclave process. Interfacial shear strength (IFSS) for two composite systems were measured by micro–debond experiments. The MTM56/CF0300 material cured by the Quickstep showed stronger fibre matrix adhesion. Since the thickness and density of the impact targets produced by two processes were different, finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to study the effect of these factors on the impact response. The simulation results showed that the difference in thickness and density affects the stress distribution under impact loading. Higher thickness and lower density caused by processing lead to less endurance to drop weight impact loading. Therefore the better performance of Quickstep laminates under impact loading was not due to the thickness and density change, but resulted from stronger mechanical properties.
Language eng
Field of Research 091202 Composite and Hybrid Materials
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2006
Copyright notice ©2006, Springer Science + Business Media, LLC
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003683

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation
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