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Real english and english lite : what texts should we teach in the english classroom? (1) or English lite and thick lit : what is the debate about?

Devlin-Glass, Frances 2006, Real english and english lite : what texts should we teach in the english classroom? (1) or English lite and thick lit : what is the debate about?, Idiom, vol. 42, no. 1, pp. 39-44.

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Title Real english and english lite : what texts should we teach in the english classroom? (1) or English lite and thick lit : what is the debate about?
Author(s) Devlin-Glass, Frances
Journal name Idiom
Volume number 42
Issue number 1
Start page 39
End page 44
Publisher Victorian Association for the Teaching of English
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2006
ISSN 0046-8568
Keyword(s) curriculum guides
English curriculum
English literature
English teachers
English teaching
literacy
literary genres
nonprint media
popular culture
secondary school curriculum
Summary Why is it that Prime Minister John Howard wants to micro-manage English curricula? Why does how teachers teach English and Literature regularly make it to the front and editorial pages of the national dailies? The author attempts to critique that phenomenon, to explain her state of mind - that of being both alert and alarmed. The latest round of the debate began with Tony Thompson's article, 'English Lite is a tragedy for students', in 'The Age' on 12 September 2005. He was concerned that VCE English might be reduced to a single print text and he was alarmed about the watering-down of curriculum driven by 'postmodern notions'. The author is at odds with many of Thompson's views and discusses her stance on various aspects of his propositions. Issues examined include Thompson's argument that no multimodal text yields as much significance as a piece of genuine literature; that students are not being 'stretched' far enough; the false dichotomy between aesthetic/formalist manoeuvres on the one hand and postmodern ones on the other; how texts make meaning to students as consumers and the rationale for the use of pop culture texts to connect with students.
Notes Reproduced with the specific permission of the copyright owner.
Language eng
Field of Research 130204 English and Literacy Curriculum and Pedagogy (excl LOTE, ESL and TESOL)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2006, Victorian Association for the Teaching of English
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003725

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.