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Introduced birds in urban remnant vegetation : does remnant size really matter?

Antos, Mark J., Fitzsimons, James, Palmer, Grant C. and White, John 2006, Introduced birds in urban remnant vegetation : does remnant size really matter?, Austral ecology, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 254-261, doi: 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2006.01572.x.

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Title Introduced birds in urban remnant vegetation : does remnant size really matter?
Author(s) Antos, Mark J.
Fitzsimons, JamesORCID iD for Fitzsimons, James orcid.org/0000-0003-4277-8040
Palmer, Grant C.
White, JohnORCID iD for White, John orcid.org/0000-0002-7375-5944
Journal name Austral ecology
Volume number 31
Issue number 2
Start page 254
End page 261
Publisher Wiley Interscience
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2006
ISSN 1442-9985
1442-9993
Keyword(s) introduced species
invasion
remnant size
urban avifauna
Summary Introduced birds are a pervasive and dominant element of urban ecosystems. We examined the richness and relative abundance of introduced bird species in small (1–5 ha) medium (6–15 ha) and large (>15 ha) remnants of native vegetation within an urban matrix. Transects were surveyed during breeding and non-breeding seasons. There was a significant relationship between introduced species richness and remnant size with larger remnants supporting more introduced species. There was no significant difference in relative abundance of introduced species in remnants of different sizes. Introduced species, as a proportion of the relative abundance of the total avifauna (native and introduced species), did not vary significantly between remnants of differing sizes. There were significant differences in the composition of introduced bird species between the different remnant sizes, with large remnants supporting significantly different assemblages than medium and small remnants. Other variables also have substantial effects on the abundance of introduced bird species. The lack of significant differences in abundance between remnant sizes suggests they were all equally susceptible to invasion. No patches in the urban matrix are likely to be unaffected by introduced species. The effective long-term control of introduced bird species is difficult and resources may be better spent managing habitat in a way which renders it less suitable for introduced species (e.g. reducing areas of disturbed ground and weed dominated areas).

Notes The definitive version is available at Wiley Online Library www.wileyonlinelibrary.com.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2006.01572.x
Field of Research 060208 Terrestrial Ecology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2006, Ecological Society of Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003764

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.