Television viewing habits associated with obesity risk factors: a survey of Melbourne schoolchildren.

Salmon, Jo, Campbell, Karen and Crawford, David 2006, Television viewing habits associated with obesity risk factors: a survey of Melbourne schoolchildren., Medical journal of Australia, vol. 184, no. 2, pp. 64-67.

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Title Television viewing habits associated with obesity risk factors: a survey of Melbourne schoolchildren.
Author(s) Salmon, Jo
Campbell, Karen
Crawford, David
Journal name Medical journal of Australia
Volume number 184
Issue number 2
Start page 64
End page 67
Publisher Australasian Medical Pub. Co
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W
Publication date 2006-01-16
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Summary Objectives: To examine whether children’s television viewing may be a useful indicator of risk of obesity-promoting versus healthy eating behaviours, low-level physical activity (PA) and overweight or obesity among children of primary school entry and exit ages. Design: Cross-sectional study, stratified by area-level socioeconomic status. Participants and setting: 1560 children (613 aged 5–6 years [50% boys], and 947 aged 10–12 years [46% boys]) from 24 primary schools in Melbourne, Australia, randomly selected proportionate to school size between 1 November 2002 and 30 December 2003 . Main outcome measures: Parents’ reports of the time their child spends watching television, their participation in organised physical activities (PA), and their food intake; each child’s measured height and weight and their PA levels as assessed by accelerometry for one week. Results: After adjusting for the age and sex of child, the parents’ level of education, clustering by school, and all other health behaviour variables, children who watched television for > 2 h/day were significantly more likely than children who watched television for ≤ 2 h/day to: to have one or more serves/day of high energy drinks (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.31; 95% CI, 1.61–3.32), and to have one or more serves/day of savoury snacks (AOR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.04–2.17). They were also less likely to have two or more serves/day of fruit (AOR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.46–0.74), or to participate in any organised PA (AOR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.34–0.80). Conclusions: Health practitioners in the primary care setting may find that asking whether a child watches television for more than 2 hours daily can be a useful indicator of a child’s risk of poor diet and low physical activity level.

Language eng
Field of Research 111706 Epidemiology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, The Medical Journal of Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003786

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