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Gatekeeping or redressing social exclusion : expectations on social work educators in relation to incarcerated students

Crisp, Beth 2006, Gatekeeping or redressing social exclusion : expectations on social work educators in relation to incarcerated students, Social work review, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 4-10.

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Title Gatekeeping or redressing social exclusion : expectations on social work educators in relation to incarcerated students
Author(s) Crisp, BethORCID iD for Crisp, Beth orcid.org/0000-0001-7863-4482
Journal name Social work review
Volume number 18
Issue number 4
Start page 4
End page 10
Publisher Aoteora New Zealand Association of Social Workers
Place of publication Auckland, New Zealand
Publication date 2006
ISSN 0113-7662
Summary Until recently, the author was in Scotland, where professional registration in social work extends to students and involves criminal record checks prior to acceptance into a course of study. She is now teaching at Deakin University in Australia, which places a high priority on making higher education available to persons and groups who have traditionally been excluded, both through the provision of courses through off campus (distance education) study mode and an innovative and culturally sensitive mode of provision for indigenous Australians. One result of our attempts to redress social exclusion is that, on occasion, we discover that some of our students are incarcerated. There are important logistical issues which may emerge as a consequence of accepting prisoners into a program of social work education. However, it would seem that the inclusion of prisoners is symbolic of a fundamental difference in philosophy with programmes of social work education in countries where there is a strong expectation that social work educators act as gatekeepers to the profession, especially in respect of students with criminal convictions. This in tum reflects an expectation among social work educators in Australia that it may be more appropriate for professional associations or registration bodies to determine whether or not a graduate with a criminal record is suitable for employment as a professional social worker. In some settings, a prior criminal record is not a barrier to being an effective service provider, as well as international differences in understandings of the social work role and employment
destinations of social work graduates.
Notes
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Language eng
Field of Research 160702 Counselling, Welfare and Community Services
130213 Vocational Education and Training Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Aoteora New Zealand Association of Social Workers
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003802

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.