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Active transport to work in Australia: is it all downhill from here?

Bell, Colin, Garrard, Jan and Swinburn, Boyd 2006, Active transport to work in Australia: is it all downhill from here?, Asia-Pacific journal of public health, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 62-68, doi: 10.1177/10105395060180011001.

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Title Active transport to work in Australia: is it all downhill from here?
Author(s) Bell, ColinORCID iD for Bell, Colin orcid.org/0000-0003-2731-9858
Garrard, Jan
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Asia-Pacific journal of public health
Volume number 18
Issue number 1
Start page 62
End page 68
Publisher Science Press
Place of publication Hong Kong
Publication date 2006-03
ISSN 1010-5395
1941-2479
Keyword(s) active transportation
walking prevalence
bicycling prevalence
trends
Australia
Summary Physical inactivity is increasing in Australia and active forms of transportation may be one way to increase the working population’s daily physical activity. We used travel-to-work data from employed persons aged 15 years and over participating in the 1996 (n=7,636,319) and 2001(n=8,298,606) Australian censuses to determine prevalence and trends in walking and cycling to work by state and gender, and differences in prevalence by age. In 2001, 3.8% of Australians walked to work and <1% cycled. Over 64% travelled to work by car. There have been small declines in walking (men and women) and cycling (men) over the 5-years from 1996 to 2001. People were more likely to walk or cycle to work if they lived in the Northern Territory, if they were male or if they were aged 15 to 24 years. They were more likely to travel by car if they lived in the Australian Capital Territory, if they were male, or if they were aged 45-54 years. Few people walk or cycle to work in Australia. Efforts to encourage active transportation are urgently needed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1177/10105395060180011001
Field of Research 111712 Health Promotion
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Sage Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003804

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