Comparing external and internal dorsal-spine bands to interpret the age and growth of the giant lantern shark, Etmopterus baxteri (Squaliformes: Etmopteridae)

Irvine, Sarah, Stevens, John and Laurenson, Laurie 2006, Comparing external and internal dorsal-spine bands to interpret the age and growth of the giant lantern shark, Etmopterus baxteri (Squaliformes: Etmopteridae), Environmental biology of fishes, vol. 77, no. 3-4, pp. 253-264.

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Title Comparing external and internal dorsal-spine bands to interpret the age and growth of the giant lantern shark, Etmopterus baxteri (Squaliformes: Etmopteridae)
Formatted title Comparing external and internal dorsal-spine bands to interpret the age and growth of the giant lantern shark, Etmopterus baxteri (Squaliformes: Etmopteridae)
Author(s) Irvine, Sarah
Stevens, John
Laurenson, Laurie
Journal name Environmental biology of fishes
Volume number 77
Issue number 3-4
Start page 253
End page 264
Publisher Springer - Verlag
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publication date 2006-12
ISSN 0378-1909
1573-5133
Keyword(s) dorsal spine
deepwater dogfish
Francis model
Summary The giant lantern shark, Etmopterus baxteri, is taken as bycatch of commercial fisheries that operate in deepwater off southeastern Australia. Bands on the second dorsal spine were used to obtain age estimates. The number of bands on the external surface of the spine and within the inner dentine layer increased with animal length. Most spines had more bands on the external surface, and the rate of band formation was significantly different between the external surface and the inner dentine layer. Females had a maximum of 57 external bands and 26 internal bands, while males had up to 48 external bands and 22 internal bands. Age estimates from external bands suggest maturity (A 50) at 20 years for males and 30 years for females. Internal band age estimates suggest maturity at 10.5 years for males and 11.5 years for females. Although there is a large discrepancy between these two preliminary (i.e., unvalidated) age estimates, they both suggest that E. baxteri is a long-lived and late maturing species that is likely to be susceptible to over fishing.
Language eng
Field of Research 060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2006, Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30003840

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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